suit

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suit

1. verb To be acceptable to one. In this usage, "suit" is followed by a reflexive pronoun. A: "I just don't have time to take a lunch break today." B: "OK, suit yourself."
2. noun A businessperson. In this usage, "suit" is the entire idiom. Oh boy, what are the suits from the corporate office doing here today?

Suit yourself.

Inf. You decide the way you want it.; Have it your way. Mary: I think I want the red one. Tom: Suit yourself. John (reading the menu): The steak sounds good, but it's hard to pass up the fried chicken. Sally: Suit yourself. I'll have the steak.
See also: suit

suit oneself

Do as one pleases, as in We had expected you, but if you don't want to come, suit yourself. This idiom, which uses suit in the sense of "be agreeable or convenient," is often put as an imperative. [Late 1800s]
See also: suit

suit

n. a businessman or businesswoman; someone who is in charge. A couple of suits checked into a working-class hotel and caused some eyebrows to raise.
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References in classic literature ?
Neither strangle anybody nor smash anything, Porthos; I will manage it all; put on one of your thirty-six suits, and come with me to a tailor.
Therefore, I have taken the liberty of providing a pretty street suit for Rose.
The rogues sat up the whole of the night before the day on which the procession was to take place, and had sixteen lights burning, so that everyone might see how anxious they were to finish the Emperor's new suit.
Sancho, as he showed the rents in his torn suit to the duchess, observed, "If we had been hunting hares, or after small birds, my coat would have been safe from being in the plight it's in; I don't know what pleasure one can find in lying in wait for an animal that may take your life with his tusk if he gets at you.
I can prepare for and put up with a regularly bad day, but these ha'porth-of-all-sorts kind of days do not suit me.
It would be a little tight for your neck; something to lie down and hang would suit you better," she said, with some satisfaction.
Meanwhile, Dorothy had dressed herself in a pretty gown of soft grey embroidered with silver, and put a blue-and-gold suit of satin upon little Button-Bright, who looked as sweet as a cherub in it.
That will make a lovely suit," cried Polly, going on with the review.
And--oh, yes--a water-front comrade of earlier years drifted along one day with a dress suit wrapped in newspapers.
He's gone and burned up his wife's new, brown broadcloth suit, that she paid twenty-five dollars for in Charlottetown, because he declares the men looked too admiring at her when she wore it to church the first time.
The bottle-green,' said old Arthur; 'the bottle-green was a famous suit to wear, and I bought it very cheap at a pawnbroker's, and there was--he, he, he
Kings and queens who wear a suit but once, though made by some tailor or dressmaker to their majesties, cannot know the comfort of wearing a suit that fits.
Geppetto did not have a penny in his pocket, so he made his son a little suit of flowered paper, a pair of shoes from the bark of a tree, and a tiny cap from a bit of dough.
Pawnee," continued the old man, always changing his language to suit the person he addressed, and not unfrequently according to the ideas he expressed, "it is a custom of my people for the father to leave his blessing with the son, before he shuts his eves for ever.
He could not refuse to see that the costs of this protracted suit would take more than he possessed to pay them; but he appeared to himself to be full of expedients by which he could ward off any results but such as were tolerable, and could avoid the appearance of breaking down in the world.