suit

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suit

slang A businessperson. The phrase refers to the formal attire worn by many businesspeople and is typically used in a mildly derogatory way. Oh boy, what are the suits from the corporate office doing here today? I never thought I'd be a suit and work nine to five in an office, but I actually like my job.

Suit yourself.

Inf. You decide the way you want it.; Have it your way. Mary: I think I want the red one. Tom: Suit yourself. John (reading the menu): The steak sounds good, but it's hard to pass up the fried chicken. Sally: Suit yourself. I'll have the steak.
See also: suit

suit oneself

Do as one pleases, as in We had expected you, but if you don't want to come, suit yourself. This idiom, which uses suit in the sense of "be agreeable or convenient," is often put as an imperative. [Late 1800s]
See also: suit

ˌsuit yourˈself

(informal)
1 do exactly what you like: I choose my assignments to suit myself.
2 usually used in orders to tell somebody to do what they want, even though it might annoy you: ‘I don’t want anything to eat, I’m on a diet.’ ‘All right, suit yourself!’
See also: suit

suit

n. a businessman or businesswoman; someone who is in charge. A couple of suits checked into a working-class hotel and caused some eyebrows to raise.
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