suggestive

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suggestive of (something)

1. Evocative or reminiscent of something. The artist's songs are suggestive of European folk music. These ruins are suggestive of a highly organized society living within the cliffsides themselves.
2. Implying, expressing, or making evident something in an indirect or unclear manner. The figures are suggestive of an economy that has not yet become totally stable. The protests and demonstrations are suggestive of a nascent but strong-willed rebellion.
See also: of, suggestive

*suggestive of something

reminiscent of something; suggesting something. (*Typically: be ~; become ~.) Bill's homemade soup is suggestive of his mother's. The new movie was suggestive of an old one I had seen on TV.
See also: of, suggestive
References in periodicals archive ?
(44) Brathwaite's determination of unnecessary suggestiveness, combined with Biggers' admissibility determination for identifications deemed unnecessarily suggestive, remains the two-pronged test in federal courts, despite its reliance on outdated psychological conceptions of reliability and the absence of meaningful procedural protections against the many inherent flaws of eyewitness identifications.
The questionnaire prompted participants to rate the culpability of the perpetrator, the likelihood that the eyewitness conditions will lead to an accurate eyewitness identification, and the suggestiveness of the lineup procedures used by the police.
And just as Maddin works from the "trivial to the genuinely important," so, too, does Beard trace the source, nuance and suggestiveness of almost every detail.
Sullivan's powerful suggestiveness is emblematic of Leveaux's production.
Haifa Wehbe (pictured), full of sexual suggestiveness, is the bad girl to Ajram's 'girl next door'.
It is likewise to be remarked, as a general rule, that there is far more of the picturesque, more truth to native and characteristic tendencies, and vastly greater suggestiveness, in the back view of a residence, whether in town or country, than in its front.
Solutions that resonate do so because they meet the exigence with emotional or aesthetic appeal, often achieved by the suggestiveness of the nomenclature itself, the way that words spur the imagination, perhaps through encrusted connotations or metaphoric power.
The pictures are superb: adding both atmosphere and suggestiveness. Again, this is a great book to engender discussion, let alone a provocation for children to find out about metamorphosis.
The piece has a sexy suggestiveness beneath the social conventions of the 18th century.
Like the subtle, elegant terrorism of Edward Hopper canvases, however, the stories both invite and disturb, their world at once recognizable and entirely symbolic, characters shaped into forms but denied reassuring clarity, their stories driven by inexplicable forces, symbols casually blurring with quiet irony into archetypal suggestiveness as the aesthetic landscape itself edges uneasily toward the dreamlike.
Blending historical depth and theoretical suggestiveness, Genres of the Credit Economy offers a fresh instance of Poovey's interest in what she described in Making a Social Body as a study of historical epistemology or "the production of what counts as knowledge at any given time" (3), or, as she put it in A History of the Modern Fact, the question of "the organizational principles inherent in the kinds of knowledge by which subjects of the modern world manage our relationships with each other and with society" (xv).
Leave those tactics to Higgins' marvelously fierce Widow Corney, a perfect ying to Bonneau's yang on the comic suggestiveness of "I Shall Scream." Deanna Saint-Souver's choreography shines on "I'd Do Anything," a wistful vision of an imagined life of comfort warmly enacted by Williams, Ludt, Silverio, Call and the rest of Fagin's gang.
"If you look at her clips there's definitely an increase of sexual suggestiveness and visually there's things like fetish wear,'' Fletcher added.