sugarcoat (something)

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sugarcoat (something)

To say, explain, or present something in a manner that is easier to accept, understand, cope with, or endure. Don't sugarcoat it for me, Doc—is my wife going to make it? My grandmother was never one to sugarcoat her criticisms. If she thought you had messed up, she would tell you in no uncertain terms.
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sugarcoated

Said, explained, or presented in a manner that is easier to accept, understand, cope with, or endure. Stop giving me sugarcoated responses whenever I ask about the state of the project. I need to know how it's actually progressing! It doesn't have to be sugarcoated, but you should aim to be a bit more empathetic when you deliver a prognosis to one of you patients.
See also: sugarcoat
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sugarcoated

mod. palatable; inoffensive; easy to take. Math is so sugarcoated these days. Even I could learn it.
See also: sugarcoat
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Release date- 01082019 - A vaccine based on sugar coats does have the potential to combat a multi-resistant staphylococcus.
However, following research with mice, the German researchers stated that a vaccine based on sugar coats is too weak in generating antibodies and therefore does not adequately protect the mice against infections.
'A number of vaccines in the Dutch National Vaccination Programme are also based on the recognition of sugar coats. But you only get a good response if in the vaccine, you attach the sugar molecule to a protein: this is called a glycoconjugate.
Staphylococcus envelop themselves in different sugar coats. These sugar coats protect the bacteria against phages: viruses that can infect and kill a bacterium.
As a second experiment, the German researchers immunised mice with sugar molecules from the known and the new sugar coats of Staphylococcus aureus.
'In Leiden, Jeroen Codee chemically copied several sugar coats. This enables us to measure very accurately the amount of antibodies against these different sugar coats in our blood serum.
By the time the vaccine hit clinics, a small number of pneumonia bacteria had already swapped DNA with other bacteria and changed their sugar coats to serotype 19A.