suffice (it) to say

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suffice (it) to say

In short; in summary; it is enough to say. Often followed by "that." I won't go into the details of our conversation, but suffice it to say that Bob won't be coming back on Monday. There were a lot of unexpected hurdles in the application process, and the whole thing turned out to be a lot more complex than we anticipated. Anyway, suffice to say, we were granted planning permission for the new office in the end.
See also: say, suffice

suffice it to say

It is enough to say this and no more, as in Suffice it to say that the judge was furious when the invitation was withdrawn. [Late 1600s]
See also: say, suffice

suffice (it) to say (that)...

(formal) used for saying that you could say much more about somebody/something but you do not want or need to: I won’t tell you all that was said at the meeting. Suffice it to say that they approved our plan.
Suffice it here means ‘it is enough’.
See also: suffice

suffice it to say

It should be enough to state the following. This phrase, indicating that what follows is all that should be said about something, dates from the seventeenth century. John Dryden used it in St. Evremont’s Miscellaneous Essays (1692): “It suffices to say that Xanthippus becoming the manager of affairs, altered extremely the Carthaginian Army.”
See also: say, suffice
References in periodicals archive ?
To reveal the story would ruin the experience - suffice to say that big boss battles, even bigger, beautiful cut-scenes and the kind of gameplay twists you could never predict, all ensure that this series goes out with a barnstorming bang.
While I'm not prepared to share the details of my broken promises to myself with quite as wide an audience as the Chronicle's readership, suffice to say I haven't lost the weight I promised I would this time last year.
Suffice to say, things are just a little bit awkward!
Suffice to say, there are indeed giggles galore as our Antipodean heroes try to right their own wrong in the adventure of their lifetime.
Suffice to say he is now negotiating a reunion with Jo, his wife of 23 years.
Suffice to say the news that Terry was back in light training yesterday must be music to the ears of Blues boss Jose Mourinho.
A Kevin Philips hat-trick and Diomansy Kamara's double did the damage and Mowbray said:"Suffice to say it was an interesting afternoon."
McLeish said: "Suffice to say, I'm disappointed with our performance today.
Suffice to say the burly No 2 was just a little pumped up and when he grabbed poor Stuart's microphone for the second time I thought he was about to launch into his best Jimmy Cagney impression: ``Look at me, ma, I'm on top of the world, ma!''
Suffice to say the remaining place will be left empty.
Suffice to say the PM's group was certainly all Downton Abbey and no Benidorm.
Chief Inspector Stephen Martin said: "Suffice to say that when I use the terms that this was vicious and it was sustained and it was disgusting those are words that are very appropiate."
Suffice to say they spout a lot more sense than the highly-paid lot do - even if the sum total of their utterings is baaaaa!
Suffice to say that less than half way into the programme I was so distressed I had to switch off.
But, suffice to say, when a swarthy, raven-haired Italian signorina starts placing pizza before you at random intervals it's probably time to check your pulse.