suffice (it) to say

suffice (it) to say

In short; in summary; it is enough to say. Often followed by "that." I won't go into the details of our conversation, but suffice it to say that Bob won't be coming back on Monday. There were a lot of unexpected hurdles in the application process, and the whole thing turned out to be a lot more complex than we anticipated. Anyway, suffice to say, we were granted planning permission for the new office in the end.
See also: say, suffice

suffice it to say

It is enough to say this and no more, as in Suffice it to say that the judge was furious when the invitation was withdrawn. [Late 1600s]
See also: say, suffice

suffice (it) to say (that)...

(formal) used for saying that you could say much more about somebody/something but you do not want or need to: I won’t tell you all that was said at the meeting. Suffice it to say that they approved our plan.
Suffice it here means ‘it is enough’.
See also: suffice

suffice it to say

It should be enough to state the following. This phrase, indicating that what follows is all that should be said about something, dates from the seventeenth century. John Dryden used it in St. Evremont’s Miscellaneous Essays (1692): “It suffices to say that Xanthippus becoming the manager of affairs, altered extremely the Carthaginian Army.”
See also: say, suffice