suffer


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suffer the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to suffer the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will suffer the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, suffer

not suffer fools (gladly)

To refuse to deal with or tolerate ignorant people or behavior. My father was a shrewd, well respected businessman who didn't suffer fools gladly. You'll learn not to suffer fools when you've been in this job for a few weeks.
See also: fool, not, suffer

suffer from (something)

1. To be afflicted by some ailment or injury. My father suffered from depression all his life. The poor child suffers from terrible eczema on her arms and legs.
2. To be forced to endure some negative condition or status. This area suffers from frequent droughts. The country has been suffering from a severe economic depression since leaving the customs union three years ago.
See also: suffer

suffer a setback

To experience or encounter some kind of minor delay, obstacle, impasse, or failure. The project suffered a setback when we realized the manufacturer had stopped producing the part we needed. After suffering a couple of setbacks early on, the company has finally started making consistent profits and growth.
See also: suffer

suffer an attack of (some illness)

To be stricken by a sudden or acute onset of some kind of illness or its symptoms. I went to bed early last night after suffering a severe attack of indigestion. He suffered an asthma attack halfway through the hike.
See also: attack, of, suffer

suffer under (one)

To be forced to live or cope with the oppression of some brutal or repellent figure of authority. We suffered under the dictatorship for nearly 40 years, before the revolution brought democracy to our country. If we have to suffer under another pig-headed general manager like Tom, I swear I'll hand in my two weeks' notice.
See also: suffer

suffer a setback

to have a minor or temporary failure. We suffered a setback when much of our vineyard was damaged by a fungus.
See also: suffer

suffer an attack

 (of an illness)
1. Go to an attack (of an illness).
See also: attack, suffer

suffer from something

to endure or experience unpleasantness, a disease, or a health condition. Jeff is suffering from the flu. I'm afraid that you must suffer from the disease until it has run its course. Toby is really suffering from the cold.
See also: suffer

suffer under someone

to endure the punishments or bad treatment of someone. The citizens suffered badly under the rule of the cruel king. We suffered under Carlos and we will suffer under his successor.
See also: suffer

not suffer fools gladly

Refuse to tolerate stupidity, as in Chris can be intimidating at these meetings; she does not suffer fools gladly. This expression comes from the New Testament (II Corinthians 11:19), where Paul sarcastically says, "For ye suffer fools gladly, seeing ye yourselves are wise." [c. 1600]
See also: fool, gladly, not, suffer

not suffer fools gladly

If you do not suffer fools gladly, you are not patient with people who you think are stupid. She doesn't suffer fools gladly and, in her view, most people are fools.
See also: fool, gladly, not, suffer

not suffer fools gladly

be impatient or intolerant towards people you regard as unwise or unintelligent.
This expression refers to 2 Corinthians 11:19: ‘For ye suffer fools gladly, seeing ye yourselves are wise’.
2001 Daily Telegraph Such was her expertise as a Victorianist that her advice was widely sought, though she did not suffer fools gladly.
See also: fool, gladly, not, suffer

not suffer fools ˈgladly

not be patient or polite with people who are less intelligent than you: He says what he thinks and doesn’t suffer fools gladly. Some people consider him a bit arrogant.
Suffer here means ‘accept somebody annoying or unpleasant without complaining’.
See also: fool, gladly, not, suffer

suffer from

v.
To be sick with or afflicted by some condition: I suffer from many different allergies. The country is suffering from a drought.
See also: suffer

suffer fools gladly, does not

Refuses to put up with stupidity. This rather flip rejection of those one considers stupid comes from the King James translation of the Bible, “For ye suffer fools gladly, seeing ye yourselves are wise” (2 Corinthians 11:19). This statement, of course, is a sarcasm; Paul actually is saying that those who put up with fools (in this instance, braggarts) are themselves fools. Today the term is always used in the negative.
See also: does, fool, not, suffer
References in periodicals archive ?
If you understand perfection in a way that includes the ability to make oneself vulnerable to another out of love, then many theologians today would say we want to ascribe that to God, even though we don't know exactly what it means for God to suffer.
In order to illustrate differences between happiness and suffering with regard to solidarity, let us imagine two groups: Group x, those who suffer, and Group y, those who happy.
An individual with intense physical pain will not suffer if s/he believes the pain is treatable, is not a threat to his/her intactness, is not cause for alienation by others, and that help is available.
The study noted that women aged 40 and over were 2.4 times more likely to suffer migraines than those under 20.
Chinese drink very little red wine and suffer fewer heart attacks than us.
Theme one: Preparing to suffer. Nearly all the individuals interviewed reported that they were prepared to suffer before the persecution began.
But it's not just at work that people suffer from bowel conditions brought on by stress ( the research found, romantically, that over 100,000 people claim to have had tummy trouble before a first date, with the same number of weddings spoiled to some extent by a nervous gut!
Diving into Crisis: A Modest Technique I suspect that quite a number of writing teachers suffer with this problem at different times and to different degrees.
Some people also suffer an immediate allergic reaction to wheat or gluten, and others say they just feel better without it.
Historically, half of the patients who die from cancer suffer similar symptoms, including pain, labored breathing, distress, nausea, confusion and other physical and psychological conditions that go untreated or under-treated.
Disabled people do not necessarily 'suffer' from their physical or psychological differences; they suffer, as non-disabled people do, from the cultural representations that are placed upon them.
If it's a couple hours of driving, that's one thing, but when you get to flying some-where like a trip to London, you can see where the circumstances can be more complicated, your performance would suffer at each stage of the journey."
OTTAWA -- As many Canadians suffer from major depression as from other leading chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes or a thyroid problem, says a report recently released from the Canadian Community Health Survey.
As David Swann points out in Gordon Legge's profile in this issue, ordinary Iraqis are suffering dreadfully--and will suffer more if war breaks out.
Making sense of suffering in this way seemed callous inasmuch as it was a process of sense-making from the standpoint of those who didn't suffer, and this picture of justice struck me as shallow, perhaps even cold.