suction

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suck

1. and suction n. liquor; wine; beer; strong drink. How about a little glass of suck before we leave?
2. and suck something up tv. to drink beer or liquor. Yeah, I’ll suck one up with ya.
3. in. [for someone or something] to be bad or undesirable. This movie sucks!
4. and suction n. influence. He thinks he has suck, but he’s just a pain in the neck.

suction

verb
See suck
References in periodicals archive ?
The colony counts in air cultures collected 10 cm, 50 cm, and 100 cm away from the endotracheal intubation site in the open suctioning group were significantly greater than the counts in the closed suctioning group (colony-forming units [CFU]/plate: 72.
The length and diameter of the suction tubing itself will play a vital role in the suctioning task.
7-9] Good, evidence-based clinical practice suggests that in order to ensure pulmonary secretions are easily manageable with suctioning, adequate humidification of inspired gas is likely to be more effective than instillation of normal saline.
To suction debris under the posterior aspect of the tongue in the lingual vestibule, the dentist can use a mouth mirror to lift up the tongue at the posterior aspect so as to squirt water under the tongue to float up debris for suctioning using the HVE suction tip.
Again, a side channel is required for delivery of topical anesthetic, biopsy, or suctioning.
The syndrome occurred in 4% of 1,245 infants who received intrapartum suctioning and 4% of the control infants, said Dr.
Subsequently, a similar historical-comparison trial in 1988 and a 1992 observational comparison of infants suctioned before or after delivery of the shoulders failed to find any benefit from suctioning before shoulder delivery.
Suctioning is a common procedure but it is not benign.
2]), arterial blood gas, HR and BP-were obtained 5 minutes pre suctioning and again at 1-, 5-, 10-, 30-and 60-minute intervals, post suctioning.
In addition to placing an infant at risk, NP suctioning uses valuable nursing time.
It is designed for a medical first response and is suitable as well for rapid suctioning required for chemical or biological warfare.
The Portex[R] SuctionPro[TM] 72 Closed Suction System, is designed for airway suctioning of critically ill patients and is indicated for 72 hours of continuous use.
This device attaches to small sterile catheters for suctioning infants or children, and yet can be interchanged in seconds for adults by using large bore Yankauers.
The Res-Q-Vac is a hand-operated, portable, lightweight suctioning device and can be used at home for suctioning patients with tracheotomies, swallowing disorders, excessive fluid or phlegm, Cerebal Palsy and any time suction is needed in the naso-pharynx.