suck in

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suck in

1. To physically pull someone or something in (to or toward something) through the force of suction. A noun or pronoun can be used between "suck" and "in." My cat is terrified of the vacuum cleaner, even though it's certainly not strong enough to suck him in. Don't suck in on the straw so hard, could choke on something.
2. To draw or contract something inward in a way that resembles suction. A noun or pronoun can be used between "suck" and "in." You don't need to suck your gut in around me, Tom. The animal sucks its arms and legs in to become almost perfectly round.
3. To cause someone to become involved or embroiled (in something). A noun or pronoun can be used between "suck" and "in." Don't try to suck me in—I've got enough problems of my own to deal with! I was only supposed to be an advisor to the project, but I kept getting sucked further and further in.
4. To interest or intrigue someone so as to fully engage them (in something). A noun or pronoun can be used between "suck" and "in." Her latest novel will suck you in as soon as you start reading, I promise. I wasn't really enjoying it too much for the first few episodes, but the shows been slowly sucking me in.
5. To con, swindle, or deceive someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "suck" and "in." The get-rich-quick guru sucked in tens of thousands of people for nearly $3 million, almost all of which is still unaccounted for by authorities. I can't believe you let that sleazy sales rep suck you in like that—you didn't even want a new television!
See also: suck

suck someone in

 and take someone in
to deceive someone. I try to shop carefully so that no one can take me in. I think that someone sucked in both of them. I don't know why they bought this car.
See also: suck

suck something in

 
1. Lit. to draw something into one's mouth by sucking. She sucked the milk shake in so hard she nearly collapsed the straw. Liz sucked in the fresh air.
2. Fig. to draw in one's belly, gut, or stomach. Suck that belly in! Suck in that gut!
See also: suck

suck in

1. Also, suck into. Draw into a course of action, as in They sucked me into helping them raise money. [Second half of 1700s]
2. Take advantage of, cheat, swindle, as in That used-car salesman sure sucked in my uncle and aunt. This usage employs suck in the sense of "take in." [First half of 1800s]
See also: suck

suck in

v.
1. To draw or pull something in by or as if by suction: The pump occasionally sucks in dirt. The filter sucks air in through a vent. I sucked in my stomach so I would look thinner.
2. To take advantage of someone; cheat or swindle someone: The greedy lawyer sucked us in with false promises. This scam sucks in many unsuspecting tourists.
See also: suck