subordinate to (someone or something)

(redirected from subordinates to)

subordinate to (someone or something)

1. adjective Subject to the control or authority of someone or something else. They want me to oversee all day-to-day duties of this branch, but I'll still be subordinate to the regional manager. The strength of an economic market is still subordinate to that country's level of industrialization.
2. adjective Lesser or inferior in importance or authority compared to someone or something else; secondary to someone or something. Right now I consider those issues to be subordinate to having a good first impression from consumers. It can be hard when you feel subordinate to some of the other people in you
3. verb To cause someone, something, or oneself controlled by or subservient to someone or something else. The buyout will subordinate their company to the massive conglomerate that purchased them. He wasn't willing to subordinate himself to the board of directors, so they forced him to resign.
4. verb To make someone, something, or oneself lesser, inferior, or secondary to someone or something else. You're never going to get ahead in this industry if you keep subordinating yourself to others. You've got to believe in yourself, or else no one else will. It's clear that they subordinated safety to aesthetics when they were designing this car.
See also: subordinate

subordinate someone or something to (someone or something else)

to put someone in an inferior position to someone else; to put something in an inferior position to something else. I am going to have to subordinate you to the other manager, because she has more experience. The first thing you learn is that you must subordinate yourself to your boss.
See also: subordinate
References in periodicals archive ?
One survey was for subordinates to self-evaluate managerial competencies and the other one was for subordinates to evaluate managerial competencies of their supervisors.
Third, results indicated that supervisors perceived their subordinates to be less able to lie in general than subordinates' perceived their supervisors' ability to lie in general, t(208) = -2.63, p < .01, r = -.18.
The manager may also determine the number of subordinates to consult.
At Gettysburg, Lee seemed reluctant to assemble his key subordinates to jointly discuss strategy.
Fifth, general, ambiguous questions lead subordinates to feel they are not being controlled because they have the freedom to respond in any way they wish.
In time, though, recognizing it would not be possible for those senior partners to make every client call--especially for minor questions or issues that could be addressed in a telephone conversation--he arranged for subordinates to make those contacts.
Successful leaders encourage their subordinates to attend challenging, career-advancing courses such as the Army Management Staff College's Sustaining Base Leadership and Management Program.
We predict that reducing the horizontal information asymmetry among subordinates promotes social competition, thereby motivating subordinates to increase their budget proposals and performance.
Within organizations, ingratiation is defined as illicit attempts by subordinates to increase their interpersonal attractiveness in the eyes of their manager.
The final theory in this area, transformational leadership, reveals how and when leaders can get subordinates to transcend their self-interest for the sake of the leader, the team, or the organization.
This process asks supervisors to rate themselves and subordinates to rate their supervisors on the same items.
Performance appraisals have been characterized by employees as acceptable, fair, and effective when 1) opportunities to challenge or rebut evaluations exist, 2) two-way communication is encouraged, 3) raters are familiar with the work of subordinates, and 4) there is a consistent application of performance standards.|12~ Collectively, research makes it clear that it is critically important for managers and their subordinates to have shared perceptions regarding the appraisal purpose and process.
An effective manager expects subordinates to complete work only to discover that faith in an individual often must precede the justification for it, and expecting the best is the most effective way to bring out the best in an individual.
According to the April 2001 GAO report (GAO-01-510) Best Practices: DoD Teaming Practices Not Achieving Potential Results, "In the programs experiencing problems, the teams either did not have the authority or the right mix of expertise to be considered integrated product teams." Yet Rick's situation involves not lack of authority or expertise--they are adequately trained, have the necessary skills, and he wants them to take ownership--but lack of willingness on the part of subordinates to accept the level of empowerment offered by their manager.
She could have asked her prospective boss about it and then interviewed subordinates to see if any alarm bells went off.