subordinate to (someone or something)

(redirected from subordinate herself to)

subordinate to (someone or something)

1. adjective Subject to the control or authority of someone or something else. They want me to oversee all day-to-day duties of this branch, but I'll still be subordinate to the regional manager. The strength of an economic market is still subordinate to that country's level of industrialization.
2. adjective Lesser or inferior in importance or authority compared to someone or something else; secondary to someone or something. Right now I consider those issues to be subordinate to having a good first impression from consumers. It can be hard when you feel subordinate to some of the other people in you
3. verb To cause someone, something, or oneself controlled by or subservient to someone or something else. The buyout will subordinate their company to the massive conglomerate that purchased them. He wasn't willing to subordinate himself to the board of directors, so they forced him to resign.
4. verb To make someone, something, or oneself lesser, inferior, or secondary to someone or something else. You're never going to get ahead in this industry if you keep subordinating yourself to others. You've got to believe in yourself, or else no one else will. It's clear that they subordinated safety to aesthetics when they were designing this car.
See also: subordinate

subordinate someone or something to (someone or something else)

to put someone in an inferior position to someone else; to put something in an inferior position to something else. I am going to have to subordinate you to the other manager, because she has more experience. The first thing you learn is that you must subordinate yourself to your boss.
See also: subordinate
References in periodicals archive ?
For both Miller and Herbert, Sophia was "eager to subordinate herself to a male who embodied her ideals and fantasies," and they both draw heavily on her letters and journals while exploring her closeness to her mother as well as to Hawthorne and their children.
Celebrated for virtue, learning, and eloquence, she chooses nonetheless to subordinate herself to male demands of enclosure and silence.