sublime


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from the ridiculous to the sublime

From something silly, foolish, or absurd to something exceptional or beautiful. Less common than "from the sublime to the ridiculous." I was pleasantly surprised by the ending to that play—it really took things from the ridiculous to the sublime.
See also: ridiculous, sublime

from the sublime to the ridiculous

From something exceptional or beautiful to something silly, foolish, or absurd. I was disappointed by the ending to that play—it unfortunately took things from the sublime to the ridiculous.
See also: ridiculous, sublime

from the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step

Something or some situation can very easily go from being exceptional or beautiful to being silly, foolish, or absurd. The opera singer was followed by a ventriloquist. From the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step.
See also: ridiculous, step, sublime

from the sublime to the ridiculous

Fig. from something fine and uplifting to something ridiculous or mundane. After Mr. Jones had introduced my wife to his wife, he jokingly turned to introduce me and said, "From the sublime to the ridiculous." After the opera singer finished, the master of ceremonies introduced the comic juggler saying, "From the sublime to the ridiculous...."
See also: ridiculous, sublime

From the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step.

Prov. Something grand can easily become very funny. Bob, I don't think you should include a bowl of breakfast cereal in your still-life painting. From the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step. The production of Macbeth went from the sublime to the ridiculous when Lady Macbeth came onstage in an old army uniform.
See also: ridiculous, step, sublime

from the sublime to the ridiculous

From the beautiful to the silly, from great to puny. For example, They played first Bach and then an ad jingle-from the sublime to the ridiculous. The reverse, from the ridiculous to the sublime, is used with the opposite meaning. Coined by Tom Paine in The Age of Reason (1794), in which he said the two are so closely related that it is but one step from one to the other, the phrase has been often repeated in either order.
See also: ridiculous, sublime

from the subˌlime to the riˈdiculous

used to describe a situation in which something serious, important or of high quality is followed by something silly, unimportant or of poor quality: His works as an artist range from the sublime to the ridiculous, with very little in between. From the sublime to the ridiculous is only one step is a translation of a phrase that was first said by Napoleon Bonaparte.
See also: ridiculous, sublime

from the sublime to the ridiculous

From outstanding to measly, famous to infamous, wonderful to silly. This expression appears to have been coined in America by Thomas Paine in his The Age of Reason (1794). The full quotation is, “The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related that it is difficult to class them separately. One step above the sublime makes the ridiculous, and one step above the ridiculous makes the sublime again.” The expression was rephrased in French by the encyclopedist Jean-François Marmontel and then repeated by Napoleon, who used it to describe the retreat of his army from Moscow.
See also: ridiculous, sublime

ridiculous to the sublime, from the

There is surprisingly little difference between the wonderful and the extremely silly. The expression linking “ridiculous” and “sublime” originated with Tom Paine in The Age of Reason (1794): “The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related that it is difficult to class them separately. One step above the sublime makes the ridiculous, and one step above the ridiculous makes the sublime again.” Napoleon, who admired Paine, repeated it in French about 1812; his version was translated as “From the sublime to the ridiculous there is only one step.” The two qualities have been paired in this way ever since.
See also: ridiculous

sublime to the ridiculous

See ridiculous to sublime.
See also: ridiculous, sublime
References in periodicals archive ?
Sublime Canna specializes in products that are appealing to the masses, yet very difficult to manufacture.
Sublime has done the same thing with its cannabis-infused Ice Pops, inspired by the common shelf-stable freezer bars that you buy in store but freeze at home.
The sublime is often described as something great, infinite, void and beyond representation.
The "natural sublime" became important in the eighteenth century when it was applied to descriptions of those aspects of nature that "instill awe and wonder such as mountains, avalanches, waterfalls, stormy seas or the infinite vault of the starry sky" (Morely 2010, 12).
El objeto de esta tercera critica kantiana es la llamada facultad de juzgar, cuyos poderes en principio son valorar lo bello y lo sublime. Ambos pertenecen a la reflexion estetica, aunque se establezcan necesarias alteraciones y variaciones dentro del mismo marco reflexivo.
Lo bello tiene de comun con lo sublime que ambos placen por si mismos.
O interesse no sublime e apresentado por Proto Longinus no tratado [phrase omitted] (Sobre o Sublime, escrito no Sec.
Entre a carne e o espirito: o sublime burkiano em "A queda da casa de Usher" de Edgar Allan Poe
Somnath Mukherjee - General Manager, The Taj West End added, "We're happy to be associated with Sublime Galleria, one of South India's foremost art galleries.
The versatile Sublime III allows you to connect any of these music sources via Bluetooth, AUX-IN, SD Card and USB with OTG cable.
The exhibition will be on till 02 August 2016 at Sublime Galleria (11am-8pm; closed on Sundays).
Assim, ao estudarmos o grotesco e o sublime em A obscena Senhora D (publicada em 1982), de Hilda Hilst, nao podemos deixar de levar em consideracao que o carater desidentificador e desfamiliarizante, ai subjacentes, da suporte diferenciado para as analises em torno do erotico, da morte, do profano e do sagrado.
The sublime has been called the "preeminent modern aesthetic category"--a well-deserved title, as the sublime stars in multiple essay collections and single-authored volumes in the twenty-first century alone.
From the Sublime to City Crime comprises twelve essays--not including the editors' co-authored introduction--covering a period in the development of British, American, and European crime fiction that snugly overlaps what we conventionally style the period of international Romanticism.
This essay argues, instead, that Paolo Sorrentino anchors his movie in the aesthetics of the sublime as a profoundly ethical category, based in our emotional and affective response to infinity and loss.