subject

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on a (subject or activity) kick

Experiencing a particularly intense and constant enthusiasm for some subject or activity. Jim's been on a real cycling kick ever since he bought that new bike. I'm on a bit of a politics kick at the moment, but I reckon it will die down once the election season is over.
See also: kick, on

change the subject

To introduce a different topic of discussion, usually intentionally. I changed the subject after that last remark made Jeff and Bill visibly tense. Don't try to change the subject—I know one of you kids dented my car!
See also: change, subject

drop the subject

Stop discussing this topic at once. Yes, I was late today—can we just drop the subject now? I don't want to talk about my ex anymore! Drop the subject!
See also: drop, subject

change the subject

to begin talking about something different. They changed the subject suddenly when the person whom they had been discussing entered the room. We'll change the subject if we are embarrassing you.
See also: change, subject

Drop the subject!

 and Drop it!
Fig. Do not discuss it further! Bill: Sally, you're gaining a little weight. I thought you were on a diet. Sally: That's enough! Drop the subject! Bill: That house is a mess. I wonder who lives there. Mary: That's my aunt's house. Just what did you want to know about it? Bill: Oh, drop it! Sorry I asked.
See also: drop

off the subject

not concerned with the subject being discussed. I got off the subject and forgot what I was supposed to be talking about. The speaker was off the subject, telling about his vacation in Hawaii.
See also: off, subject

subject someone or something to something

to cause someone to endure someone or something. I didn't mean to subject you to Uncle Harry. I am sorry I have to subject you to all this questioning.
See also: subject

subject to something

likely to have something, such as a physical disorder, The sick man was subject to dizzy spells. I am subject to frequent headaches.
See also: subject

change the subject

Deliberately talk about another topic, as in If someone asks you an embarrassing question, just change the subject. This term uses subject in the sense of "a topic of conversation," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: change, subject

subject to, be

1. Be under the control or authority of, as in All citizens in this nation are subject to the law. [First half of 1300s]
2. Be prone or disposed to, as in This child has always been subject to colds. [Late 1300s]
3. Be likely to incur or receive, as in This memo is subject to misinterpretation. [Late 1300s]
4. Depend on, be likely to be affected by, as in Our vacation plans are subject to the boss's whims. [Early 1800s]
See also: subject

change the ˈsubject

start to talk about something different, especially because what was being discussed was embarrassing or difficult to talk about: I don’t like talking about the war. Can’t we change the subject?
See also: change, subject

subject to

v.
To cause someone to undergo or experience something: The commander subjected the troops to daily inspections. The oil platform was subjected to extreme weather.
See also: subject
References in classic literature ?
Such annotations as may be useful to assist the reader in comprehending the characters of the Jew, the Templar, the Captain of the mercenaries, or Free Companions, as they were called, and others proper to the period, are added, but with a sparing hand, since sufficient information on these subjects is to be found in general history.
Favorable as this view of the subject may be, some observations remain which will place it in a light still more satisfactory.
It is the act of a faithful subject and a good Christian.
But that honor, perhaps were not fit for monarchies; except it be in the person of the monarch himself, or his sons; as it came to pass in the times of the Roman emperors, who did impropriate the actual triumphs to themselves, and their sons, for such wars as they did achieve in person; and left only, for wars achieved by subjects, some triumphal garments and ensigns to the general.
It is so intensely and deliberately didactic, and its subject is esteemed so dry, that I delight in throwing it at the heads of the wiseacres who repeat the parrot cry that art should never be didactic.
And the deeper she penetrated, not with her mind only but with her whole soul, her whole being, into the subject that absorbed her, the larger did that subject grow and the weaker and more inadequate did her powers appear, so that she concentrated them wholly on that one thing and yet was unable to accomplish all that she considered necessary.
Such a poetry could not be permanently successful, because the subjects of which it treats -- if susceptible of poetic treatment at all -- were certainly not suited for epic treatment, where unity of action which will sustain interest, and to which each part should contribute, is absolutely necessary.
And the laws which they make must be obeyed by their subjects,-- and that is what you call justice?
As soon as Miss Fairlie had left the room he spared us all embarrassment on the subject of the anonymous letter, by adverting to it of his own accord.
Both the typhoon and Captain MacWhirr presented themselves to me as the necessities of the deep conviction with which I approached the subject of the story.
After this, they conversed on different subjects until they arrived at their journey's end.
The subject would become so big in his mind that he himself would be in danger of becom- ing a grotesque.
They are given to all kinds of marvelous beliefs; are subject to trances and visions, and frequently see strange sights, and hear music and voices in the air.
ASSUMING it therefore as an established truth that the several States, in case of disunion, or such combinations of them as might happen to be formed out of the wreck of the general Confederacy, would be subject to those vicissitudes of peace and war, of friendship and enmity, with each other, which have fallen to the lot of all neighboring nations not united under one government, let us enter into a concise detail of some of the consequences that would attend such a situation.
Of things themselves some are predicable of a subject, and are never present in a subject.