subject

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Related to subjection: abiding, ailing, ascertain, seize

on a (subject or activity) kick

Experiencing a particularly intense and constant enthusiasm for some subject or activity. Jim's been on a real cycling kick ever since he bought that new bike. I'm on a bit of a politics kick at the moment, but I reckon it will die down once the election season is over.
See also: kick, on

change the subject

To introduce a different topic of discussion, usually intentionally. I changed the subject after that last remark made Jeff and Bill visibly tense. Don't try to change the subject—I know one of you kids dented my car!
See also: change, subject

drop the subject

Stop discussing this topic at once. Yes, I was late today—can we just drop the subject now? I don't want to talk about my ex anymore! Drop the subject!
See also: drop, subject

subject to (something)

1. Guided, controlled, or ruled by something. Remember, when you travel to a foreign country, you are subject to their unique laws and traditions, not your own. I'm afraid our stores are subject to the rules established by the corporate headquarters, so there's nothing we can do about it here. Of course, all of our plans there will be subject to the weather—if we get nothing but rain, we'll be spending the vacation indoors.
2. Required to receive, incur, or experience something. During your stay at this institution, your room will be subject to weekly inspections. Any company caught misrepresenting its tax liabilities will be subject to an external audit carried out by our regulatory branch.
3. Prone or susceptible to something; likely or inclined to incur or experience something. I've been subject to hay fever since I was a child. While the small island usually gets blissful sunshine, its location means it is subject to awful storms every now and then.
See also: subject

subject (one) to (someone or something)

To force one to tolerate, endure, or deal with someone or something. I'm sorry for subjecting you to my dad's political rant. He can't talk about anything else at dinner. They subjected the prisoner to all sorts of physical and mental torture to extract information from him.
See also: subject

be subject to (something)

1. To be guided, controlled, or ruled by something. Remember, when you travel to a foreign country, you are subject to their unique laws and traditions, not your own. I'm afraid our stores are subject to the rules established by the corporate headquarters, so there's nothing we can do about it here. Of course, all of our plans there will be subject to the weather—if we get nothing but rain, we'll be spending the vacation indoors.
2. To be required to receive, incur, or experience something. During your stay at this institution, your room will be subject to weekly inspections. Any company caught misrepresenting its tax liabilities will be subject to an external audit carried out by our regulatory branch.
3. To be prone or susceptible to something; to be likely or inclined to incur or experience something. I've been subject to hay fever since I was a child. While the small island usually gets blissful sunshine, its location means it is subject to awful storms every now and then.
See also: subject

off subject

Introducing, addressing, or discussing things not relevant to or concerned with the subject at hand. Sometimes hyphenated (always if used immediately before a noun). Make sure you don't go off subject during your lecture, or you'll just confuse your students. This is off-subject a bit, but what do you think about the recent economic trend in the Asian markets? My father always includes this off-subject remarks whenever he tells a story, and it just drags the whole thing out for what feels like an eternity.
See also: off, subject

off the subject

Introducing, addressing, or discussing things not relevant to or concerned with the subject at hand. Make sure you don't go off the subject during your lecture, or you'll just confuse your students. This is off the subject a bit, but what do you think about the recent economic trend in the Asian markets?
See also: off, subject

change the subject

to begin talking about something different. They changed the subject suddenly when the person whom they had been discussing entered the room. We'll change the subject if we are embarrassing you.
See also: change, subject

Drop the subject!

 and Drop it!
Fig. Do not discuss it further! Bill: Sally, you're gaining a little weight. I thought you were on a diet. Sally: That's enough! Drop the subject! Bill: That house is a mess. I wonder who lives there. Mary: That's my aunt's house. Just what did you want to know about it? Bill: Oh, drop it! Sorry I asked.
See also: drop

off the subject

not concerned with the subject being discussed. I got off the subject and forgot what I was supposed to be talking about. The speaker was off the subject, telling about his vacation in Hawaii.
See also: off, subject

subject someone or something to something

to cause someone to endure someone or something. I didn't mean to subject you to Uncle Harry. I am sorry I have to subject you to all this questioning.
See also: subject

subject to something

likely to have something, such as a physical disorder, The sick man was subject to dizzy spells. I am subject to frequent headaches.
See also: subject

change the subject

Deliberately talk about another topic, as in If someone asks you an embarrassing question, just change the subject. This term uses subject in the sense of "a topic of conversation," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: change, subject

subject to, be

1. Be under the control or authority of, as in All citizens in this nation are subject to the law. [First half of 1300s]
2. Be prone or disposed to, as in This child has always been subject to colds. [Late 1300s]
3. Be likely to incur or receive, as in This memo is subject to misinterpretation. [Late 1300s]
4. Depend on, be likely to be affected by, as in Our vacation plans are subject to the boss's whims. [Early 1800s]
See also: subject

change the ˈsubject

start to talk about something different, especially because what was being discussed was embarrassing or difficult to talk about: I don’t like talking about the war. Can’t we change the subject?
See also: change, subject

subject to

v.
To cause someone to undergo or experience something: The commander subjected the troops to daily inspections. The oil platform was subjected to extreme weather.
See also: subject
References in periodicals archive ?
And the early modern wedding vows--"The Form of Solemnization of Matrimony" from The Book of Common Prayer--made the proper marital hierarchy clear: a vow of subjection was enforced on a woman in the ceremony itself.
any necessary subjection in drilling, Resumption of premises in accordance with the rules of fire safety, - postponement of security alerts and emergency referrals to suitable areas, Including the wcc, - installation of additional screens in the station (quantities around 20 screens), - the preparatory works (soils, Cfo, Cfa) for about 25 art.
He describes an economic rather than ideological agenda driving HitlerAEs interest in Spain, and relates how a poor but resource-rich Spain became a subject in the resource-starved Third ReichAEs shadow empire as well as a test case for the future subjection of other countries.
Millions of ordinary people have suffered enough under inflation without having to bear the brunt of Common Market subjection.
The world cannot continue to stand by and watch the subjection of one group of people by an oppressive military power - which has now lasted over 47 years.
She shows how a number of writers during the period employed their creative powers to liberate men from the very institutions and ideas about power, society, and gender that promoted the subjection of women.
Despite woman' s subjection to everyday stress due to the increase of responsibilities, she manages to set the family-life and professional-life on a level of equal priority," Saab said whereby she underlined the importance of the family' s understanding and support in boosting a woman' s career.
Aa General manager of Hisham Mubarak center Ahmed Seif and executive manager of the same center Khaled Seif, along with members of the defense team presented a memo to the head of the lawyer's syndicate Hamdy Khalifa requesting that the syndicate create a committee to monitor stages of prosecution, a process the memo refers to asAa "collective arrests of suspects and subjection to violations.
By contrast, works that shun those spaces of refuge and withdrawal and make the ruling conditions of outright subjection and control the very parameters of their strategies, like Bruce Nauman's arresting video in the Italian pavilion, force an unwavering anomic opacity onto the spectator.
should also be equal one amongst another without subordination or subjection, unless the lord and master of them all should, by any manifest declaration of his will, set one above the other.
Turning to the recent work of Judith Butler, Syrotinski shows how subjectivity and agency can be defined as ambivalent forces caught between pure subjection and pure freedom.
La Boetie asserts that liberty is a "natural right" (droit naturel) which, as a rule, compels obedience to parents, subjection to "reason," enslavement to no one, and is at one with a right to property (37) In a tyranny, in which there is no liberty, there is also no property apart from what is at the tyrant's disposal, not even the property the subject has in himself: "What condition is more miserable than to live thus, not to have anything for oneself, owing someone else one's well being, freedom, body, and life?
In her remarkable, truly artful book, Carolyn Dean investigates the ways Cuzco's high-ranking Inkas handled such tricky cross-currents of privilege and subjection.
A passionate attachment to subjection is necessary for the formation of the subject.