subject


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Related to subject: Subject and object

on a (subject or activity) kick

Experiencing a particularly intense and constant enthusiasm for some subject or activity. Jim's been on a real cycling kick ever since he bought that new bike. I'm on a bit of a politics kick at the moment, but I reckon it will die down once the election season is over.
See also: kick, on

change the subject

To introduce a different topic of discussion, usually intentionally. I changed the subject after that last remark made Jeff and Bill visibly tense. Don't try to change the subject—I know one of you kids dented my car!
See also: change, subject

drop the subject

Stop discussing this topic at once. Yes, I was late today—can we just drop the subject now? I don't want to talk about my ex anymore! Drop the subject!
See also: drop, subject

subject to (something)

1. Guided, controlled, or ruled by something. Remember, when you travel to a foreign country, you are subject to their unique laws and traditions, not your own. I'm afraid our stores are subject to the rules established by the corporate headquarters, so there's nothing we can do about it here. Of course, all of our plans there will be subject to the weather—if we get nothing but rain, we'll be spending the vacation indoors.
2. Required to receive, incur, or experience something. During your stay at this institution, your room will be subject to weekly inspections. Any company caught misrepresenting its tax liabilities will be subject to an external audit carried out by our regulatory branch.
3. Prone or susceptible to something; likely or inclined to incur or experience something. I've been subject to hay fever since I was a child. While the small island usually gets blissful sunshine, its location means it is subject to awful storms every now and then.
See also: subject

subject (one) to (someone or something)

To force one to tolerate, endure, or deal with someone or something. I'm sorry for subjecting you to my dad's political rant. He can't talk about anything else at dinner. They subjected the prisoner to all sorts of physical and mental torture to extract information from him.
See also: subject

be subject to (something)

1. To be guided, controlled, or ruled by something. Remember, when you travel to a foreign country, you are subject to their unique laws and traditions, not your own. I'm afraid our stores are subject to the rules established by the corporate headquarters, so there's nothing we can do about it here. Of course, all of our plans there will be subject to the weather—if we get nothing but rain, we'll be spending the vacation indoors.
2. To be required to receive, incur, or experience something. During your stay at this institution, your room will be subject to weekly inspections. Any company caught misrepresenting its tax liabilities will be subject to an external audit carried out by our regulatory branch.
3. To be prone or susceptible to something; to be likely or inclined to incur or experience something. I've been subject to hay fever since I was a child. While the small island usually gets blissful sunshine, its location means it is subject to awful storms every now and then.
See also: subject

off subject

Introducing, addressing, or discussing things not relevant to or concerned with the subject at hand. Sometimes hyphenated (always if used immediately before a noun). Make sure you don't go off subject during your lecture, or you'll just confuse your students. This is off-subject a bit, but what do you think about the recent economic trend in the Asian markets? My father always includes this off-subject remarks whenever he tells a story, and it just drags the whole thing out for what feels like an eternity.
See also: off, subject

off the subject

Introducing, addressing, or discussing things not relevant to or concerned with the subject at hand. Make sure you don't go off the subject during your lecture, or you'll just confuse your students. This is off the subject a bit, but what do you think about the recent economic trend in the Asian markets?
See also: off, subject

change the subject

to begin talking about something different. They changed the subject suddenly when the person whom they had been discussing entered the room. We'll change the subject if we are embarrassing you.
See also: change, subject

Drop the subject!

 and Drop it!
Fig. Do not discuss it further! Bill: Sally, you're gaining a little weight. I thought you were on a diet. Sally: That's enough! Drop the subject! Bill: That house is a mess. I wonder who lives there. Mary: That's my aunt's house. Just what did you want to know about it? Bill: Oh, drop it! Sorry I asked.
See also: drop

off the subject

not concerned with the subject being discussed. I got off the subject and forgot what I was supposed to be talking about. The speaker was off the subject, telling about his vacation in Hawaii.
See also: off, subject

subject someone or something to something

to cause someone to endure someone or something. I didn't mean to subject you to Uncle Harry. I am sorry I have to subject you to all this questioning.
See also: subject

subject to something

likely to have something, such as a physical disorder, The sick man was subject to dizzy spells. I am subject to frequent headaches.
See also: subject

change the subject

Deliberately talk about another topic, as in If someone asks you an embarrassing question, just change the subject. This term uses subject in the sense of "a topic of conversation," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: change, subject

subject to, be

1. Be under the control or authority of, as in All citizens in this nation are subject to the law. [First half of 1300s]
2. Be prone or disposed to, as in This child has always been subject to colds. [Late 1300s]
3. Be likely to incur or receive, as in This memo is subject to misinterpretation. [Late 1300s]
4. Depend on, be likely to be affected by, as in Our vacation plans are subject to the boss's whims. [Early 1800s]
See also: subject

change the ˈsubject

start to talk about something different, especially because what was being discussed was embarrassing or difficult to talk about: I don’t like talking about the war. Can’t we change the subject?
See also: change, subject

subject to

v.
To cause someone to undergo or experience something: The commander subjected the troops to daily inspections. The oil platform was subjected to extreme weather.
See also: subject
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 43 students have been declared fail in all subjects. Results of 238 candidates have been withheld due to copying case while results of 383 candidates have been withheld by the Conduct Branch because of different reasons.
There is a negative difference of 8 subjects in the experimental group in the initial assessment, and a subject in the final assessment and in the control group 7 subjects in the initial assessment and 4 in the final assessment.
Each subject would have one of these bejeweled boxes and the boxes would all quietly collaborate and whisper in each subject's ear to guide the subject on the most direct and safest route possible.
1.833(j) provide that, if the sale of property at a profit within six months after its purchase could subject a person to suit under Section 16(b) of the '34 Act, the person's rights in the property are treated as subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture and as not transferable until after the earlier of the expiration of the six-month period or the first day on which a sale of such property at a profit will not subject the person to suit under Section 16(b).
When staff at the bar refused to cash the check, the subject pushed an employee, grabbed her purse, and fled on foot.
Studies of adults' understanding of controlled vocabularies such as Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) indicate that even they do not understand how controlled vocabularies are used in systems and that they, the users, can actually use these lists of terms in searching (Drabenstott, Simcox, & Fenton, 1999).
In my third example (far right), I used a long telephoto lens to compress a rain-swept landscape just outside California's Sonora Pass, and thereby to change its appearance and meaning by rearranging my subjects in space.
Wealthy expatriating individuals are subject to taxation of U.S.
A VEBA allows more tax-deductible contributions than a 401(k) plan because it is not subject to strict pension plan guidelines.
Regardless of whether isolation and quarantine induce posttraumatic stress disorder, public health officials must be cognizant of and prepared to supply appropriate emotional and social support to persons subject to isolation or quarantine.
Kasmarek has been a guest on Wisconsin Public Radio and his work is the subject of a public television documentary.
The Writing section will look like the current SAT II Writing Subject Test, containing multiple choice questions on grammar and usage as well as a student essay written in response to a prompt.
Kaufman is referring to the new Passport to Teaching fast track certification, which emphasizes subject expertise more than pedagogical methods.
Joseph Groocock's Fugal Composition: A Guide to the Study of Bach's '48' makes a recent and valuable contribution to the subject of counterpoint.
This is a book about the architectural 'subject', defined as 'the person that architects imagine experiencing their architecture'.