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back of the black stump

In or of an extremely remote, isolated, and/or uncivilized location, usually meaning the Australian outback. "Black stump" is used colloquially as an imaginary marker of the edge of civilized settlement, though the origin of the term is uncertain. Primarily heard in Australia. There are many people who still live back of the black stump, lacking access to medical care and other basic social services.
See also: back, black, of, stump

beyond the black stump

In or of an extremely remote, isolated, and/or uncivilized location, usually meaning the Australian outback. "Black stump" is used colloquially as an imaginary marker of the edge of civilized settlement, though the origin of the term is uncertain. Primarily heard in Australia. There are many people who still live beyond the black stump, lacking access to medical care and other basic social services.
See also: beyond, black, stump

black stump

An imaginary marker of the edge of civilized settlement, usually referring to the Australian outback. The origin of the term is uncertain. Primarily heard in Australia. There are many people who still live beyond the black stump, lacking access to medical care and other basic social services.
See also: black, stump

this side of the black stump

Within the local community or a general area familiar to the speaker and/or audience, where "black stump" is used colloquially as an imaginary marker of the edge of civilization. Primarily heard in Australia. You won't find a better deal this side of the black stump. I've got the tastiest recipe for beef stew this side of the black stump.
See also: black, of, side, stump, this

draw stumps

1. In cricket, to call an end of gameplay for the day, as by removing the stumps (part of the wicket) from the ground. As the umpire draws stumps for the day, India has beaten England by 133 runs.
2. By extension, to cease doing something or bring something to an end. In spite of the biting scandal, the footballer said he would not be drawing stumps on his international career. This has gotten horribly boring, let's draw stumps and go home.
See also: draw, stump

pull up stumps

1. In cricket, to call an end to gameplay for the day, as by removing the stumps (part of the wicket) from the ground. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. As the umpire draws stumps for the day, India has beaten England by 133 runs. This has gotten horribly boring, let's pull up stumps and go home.
2. By extension, to cease doing something or bring something to an end. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. In spite of the biting scandal, the footballer said he would not be pulling up the stumps on his international career. OK, I think we've done enough work for the day. Let's pull up stumps and get out of here.
3. To pack up and leave from one's camp site. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. After a week of roughing it in the countryside, we finally pulled up stumps and decided to stay in a bed and breakfast for the night before going back home.
See also: pull, stump, up

stir (one's) stumps

1. To start moving. "Stumps" are a slang term for "legs." You kids have been sitting around playing video games all day—it's time to get outside and stir your stumps!
2. To increase one's pace while doing some activity. Stir your stumps! We've got to move faster if we want to finish our run before sundown.
See also: stir, stump

take to the stump

To campaign, with an emphasis on delivering political speeches. The stump of a tree used to serve as the platform for these speeches. Primarily heard in US. If you want to be voted onto city council, you need to take to the stump and talk to the people.
See also: stump, take

up a stump

In a challenging situation. I'm a single mother who just lost her job—I'm really up a stump right now.
See also: stump, up

on the stump

Campaigning in an effort to garner votes and political support. Primarily heard in US. While on the stump in West Virginia, the candidate made several confusing remarks about her position on immigration reform.
See also: on, stump

stump for someone

to go about making political speeches in support of someone. The vice president was out stumping for members of Congress who were running this term. Since all the politicians were out stumping for one another, there was no one in the capital to vote on important legislation.
See also: stump

stump someone

to confuse or puzzle someone. I have a question that will really stump you. When was the Achaean League established?

(You've) got me stumped.

Inf. I can't possibly figure out the answer to your question. Bill: How long is the Amazon River? Jane: You've got me stumped. Bob: Do you know of a book that would interest a retired sea captain? Sally: You've got me stumped.
See also: stump

on the stump

COMMON If a politician is on the stump, he or she is travelling to different places and speaking to voters as part of their election campaign. Tariq Ali, Tony Benn and others are on the stump all over the country, speaking to loyal audiences. Despite his falling popularity, the president braved it on the stump today on behalf of his fellow Republicans. Note: This expression comes from politicians using tree stumps as platforms when giving a speech in the open air.
See also: on, stump

draw stumps

cease doing something.
In the game of cricket, the stumps are taken out of the ground at the close of play.
See also: draw, stump

stir your stumps

(of a person) begin to move or act. British informal , dated
Stump has been used as an informal term for ‘leg’ since the 15th century; the expression itself dates from the mid 16th century.
See also: stir, stump

beyond the black stump

beyond the limits of settled, and therefore civilized, life. Australian
This phrase comes from the custom of using a fire-blackened stump of wood as a marker when giving directions to travellers.
See also: beyond, black, stump

on the stump

going about the country making political speeches or canvassing. chiefly North American
In rural America in the late 18th century, the stump of a felled tree was often used as an impromptu platform for someone making a speech.
See also: on, stump

up a stump

in a situation too difficult for you to manage. US
See also: stump, up

stir your ˈstumps

(old-fashioned, British English, informal) begin to move; hurry: You stir your stumps and get ready for school, my girl!
Stump is an informal word for ‘leg’.
See also: stir, stump

stump up

v.
1. To provide some funds or capital: An investor stumped up the money to expand the business.
2. To pay some amount of money, often reluctantly: We had to stump up $30 just to get inside.
See also: stump, up

stump

1. tv. to confuse or puzzle someone. I like to stump people with hard questions.
2. tv. to visit or tour a place. We stumped all of Europe this summer.
3. n. a visit or tour. The old girl is off on another stump.
4. Go to stumps.

stumps

n. a person’s legs. You need good strong stumps to do that kind of climbing.
See also: stump
References in periodicals archive ?
In the meantime, we've compiled a Stumpy XI - with a healthy Boro contingent - which would give any team a run for their money: Goalkeeper: Dave Pheasant; Defenders: Dan Gosling, Parrot Southgate, David Wheatear and Dickie Rooks; Midfield: Craig Cygnet, Raheem Starling, Chris Eagles and Swan Mata; Striker: Bernie Raven and, Mikkel Peck; Subs: Uwe Clucks, Gareth Quail and Viktor Kingfischer; Managers: Goose Hiddink/Louis van Gull/ Manuel Peregrin-i
The tract is along the Catawba River, surrounding the Great Falls and Cedar Creek Reservoirs (also known as Stumpy Pond).
The appeal of the stumpy, pudgy-faced dolls was that each was, in some small way, unique - a computerised manufacturing process introduced little differences between each one - and, rather than buying one, you "adopted" it.
Chunky ankle length styles are leg lengtheners while calf-length can make the slimmest legs look stumpy.
Three-legged Stumpy, burned Tinker, one-eared Hank and orphaned baby Pugaloo are among the hundreds of hedgehogs lucky enough to end up in Moira Simpson's home.
WHEN I was 16 I wanted to be Blondie as opposed to a stumpy brunette but, hey ho, I wasn't going to hold that against her so off I went to see her last week.
Q My guinea pig Stumpy keeps squeaking very loudly during the night, waking me up.
It's clearly too much to hope that these lorries will stop squeezing through our narrow roads; but please drivers, spare a thought for Old Stumpy.
One of the projects includes the restoration of Stumpy Tower, pictured left, in Girvan, which was originally built as a prison in 1827 and is now a Grade B listed building in the South Ayrshire town.
SOREN KJELDSEN, small, stumpy and way down the long-driving league in 187th place, isn't the type of golfer usually latched on to by punters and that's why the Dane is often good value, writes Jeremy Chapman.
So I would imagine Kate has a wardrobe full of expensive footwear yet she's opted for these which make her toes look stumpy and ugly and expose too much of her big feet.
Viewers were said to have realised that the hand in the Super Bowl ad could not belong to the actress, famous for her stumpy thumbs.
It's just that if you feel stumpy, heels make you believe your legs look less roast leg of lamb-ish.
The second generation of the Z4 bins both the awkward angles of its predecessor and the stumpy dimensions of the 1990s Z3, and opts for a more organic look.
So they will just have to adapt their commentary: "Oh look at that basset with its ridiculously exaggerated ears and those unnaturally stumpy little legs.