stump


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Related to stump: stump up

back of the black stump

In or of an extremely remote, isolated, and/or uncivilized location, usually meaning the Australian outback. "Black stump" is used colloquially as an imaginary marker of the edge of civilized settlement, though the origin of the term is uncertain. Primarily heard in Australia. There are many people who still live back of the black stump, lacking access to medical care and other basic social services.
See also: back, black, of, stump

beyond the black stump

In or of an extremely remote, isolated, and/or uncivilized location, usually meaning the Australian outback. "Black stump" is used colloquially as an imaginary marker of the edge of civilized settlement, though the origin of the term is uncertain. Primarily heard in Australia. There are many people who still live beyond the black stump, lacking access to medical care and other basic social services.
See also: beyond, black, stump

black stump

An imaginary marker of the edge of civilized settlement, usually referring to the Australian outback. The origin of the term is uncertain. Primarily heard in Australia. There are many people who still live beyond the black stump, lacking access to medical care and other basic social services.
See also: black, stump

this side of the black stump

Within the local community or a general area familiar to the speaker and/or audience, where "black stump" is used colloquially as an imaginary marker of the edge of civilization. Primarily heard in Australia. You won't find a better deal this side of the black stump. I've got the tastiest recipe for beef stew this side of the black stump.
See also: black, of, side, stump, this

draw stumps

1. In cricket, to call an end of gameplay for the day, as by removing the stumps (part of the wicket) from the ground. As the umpire draws stumps for the day, India has beaten England by 133 runs.
2. By extension, to cease doing something or bring something to an end. In spite of the biting scandal, the footballer said he would not be drawing stumps on his international career. This has gotten horribly boring, let's draw stumps and go home.
See also: draw, stump

pull up stumps

1. In cricket, to call an end to gameplay for the day, as by removing the stumps (part of the wicket) from the ground. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. As the umpire draws stumps for the day, India has beaten England by 133 runs. This has gotten horribly boring, let's pull up stumps and go home.
2. By extension, to cease doing something or bring something to an end. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. In spite of the biting scandal, the footballer said he would not be pulling up the stumps on his international career. OK, I think we've done enough work for the day. Let's pull up stumps and get out of here.
3. To pack up and leave from one's camp site. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. After a week of roughing it in the countryside, we finally pulled up stumps and decided to stay in a bed and breakfast for the night before going back home.
See also: pull, stump, up

stir (one's) stumps

1. To start moving. "Stumps" are a slang term for "legs." You kids have been sitting around playing video games all day—it's time to get outside and stir your stumps!
2. To increase one's pace while doing some activity. Stir your stumps! We've got to move faster if we want to finish our run before sundown.
See also: stir, stump

take to the stump

To campaign, with an emphasis on delivering political speeches. The stump of a tree used to serve as the platform for these speeches. Primarily heard in US. If you want to be voted onto city council, you need to take to the stump and talk to the people.
See also: stump, take

up a stump

In a challenging situation. I'm a single mother who just lost her job—I'm really up a stump right now.
See also: stump, up

on the stump

Campaigning across the country in an effort to garner votes and political support. While on the stump in West Virginia, the candidate made several confusing remarks about her position on immigration reform.
See also: on, stump

stump for someone

to go about making political speeches in support of someone. The vice president was out stumping for members of Congress who were running this term. Since all the politicians were out stumping for one another, there was no one in the capital to vote on important legislation.
See also: stump

stump someone

to confuse or puzzle someone. I have a question that will really stump you. When was the Achaean League established?

(You've) got me stumped.

Inf. I can't possibly figure out the answer to your question. Bill: How long is the Amazon River? Jane: You've got me stumped. Bob: Do you know of a book that would interest a retired sea captain? Sally: You've got me stumped.
See also: stump

on the stump

COMMON If a politician is on the stump, he or she is travelling to different places and speaking to voters as part of their election campaign. Tariq Ali, Tony Benn and others are on the stump all over the country, speaking to loyal audiences. Despite his falling popularity, the president braved it on the stump today on behalf of his fellow Republicans. Note: This expression comes from politicians using tree stumps as platforms when giving a speech in the open air.
See also: on, stump

stump up

v.
1. To provide some funds or capital: An investor stumped up the money to expand the business.
2. To pay some amount of money, often reluctantly: We had to stump up $30 just to get inside.
See also: stump, up

stump

1. tv. to confuse or puzzle someone. I like to stump people with hard questions.
2. tv. to visit or tour a place. We stumped all of Europe this summer.
3. n. a visit or tour. The old girl is off on another stump.
4. Go to stumps.

stumps

n. a person’s legs. You need good strong stumps to do that kind of climbing.
See also: stump
References in periodicals archive ?
It doesn't matter where the batsman eventually ends up - usually they move across their stumps - it's all about the normal batting stance (ie where they started).
Saxton & Stump represents a new and unique business model dedicated to the changing and often challenging needs of the health care community," said James Saxton.
I followed Stump around to the other side and we started kicking at clumps of grass that might hide a small cadaver.
Alternatively you can treat the stump with chemicals which will rot the remainder of the tree over a period of time.
Hall (1960) for example, found that 90% of cut stumps were within 35 m of the water body with the lodge.
On his bowling show, Newell said that with the first ball all he had just wanted to try and hit the stumps, following which he repeated his action with the second ball, adding that he was successful with the third ball mostly due to the crowd's cheering.
I calmly stepped off the tractor--which wasn't not too far, considering it was sitting on the ground--and walked slowly back to the stump.
Stump appendicitis is a rare entity that occurs as a result of inflammation of the appendiceal remnant.
Dismissals don't come any more spectacular than Chris Read's, middle stump sent halfway back to Richard Johnson by a ball of chilling pace.
The tree stump juts from the sand between Waldport and Yachats, about a mile south of Governor Patterson State Park and a mile north of Beachside State Park.
Suhoski said, the town would have to go to a special town meeting to seek money for stump removal.
Stump earned a bachelor's degree from Wichita State University, studying with Robert Steinbauer.
Surgery was performed, and the ureteral stump was excised completely, with a bladder cuff with lymph node dissection.
Jordan Stump, The Other Book: Bewilderments of Fiction.
Basal or stump sprouting following wildfire or tree harvest is common for many oak species and is the primary mechanism for oak regeneration in this study area.