strip (someone or something) of (something)

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strip (someone or something) of (something)

1. To remove some outer layer or covering from someone or something, especially in a rough or forceful manner. The incredible winds stripped our roof of a bunch of its tiles last night. I stripped him of his clothes and hurried him into the shower before the chemicals burned his body.
2. To remove, take, or steal something from someone or something, especially in a forceful or brutish manner; to deprive someone or something of something. The authoritarian government has been slowly stripping its citizens' of basic freedoms ever since it came into power. The federal regulators stripped the company of its accreditation after their investigation revealed numerous infractions. He was stripped of his rank for deserting his company during combat.
See also: of, strip
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

strip someone or something of something

to take something, such as status or property, away from someone or something. The court stripped him of all his property. We stripped him of his rights when we put him in jail.
See also: of, strip
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

strip of

v.
1. To deprive someone or something of some covering or ornament: The tornado stripped the tree of its leaves. The manuscript was stripped of its academic jargon.
2. To deprive someone of some honor, rank, office, privilege, or possession: Losing my job and my house stripped me of my dignity. The officers were court-martialed and stripped of their ranks.
See also: of, strip
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Break ups strip someone of their self-esteem and image.
But what we cannot have is a man, an individual, placed at the top of an ideology, who has the power by religious edict to strip someone of their hereafter and use that for political gains.
Prince Salman states clearly: "What we cannot have is a man, an individual, placed at the top of an ideology, who has the power by religious edict to strip someone of their hereafter and use that for political gains."
I'd like to have heard more about Maurice Lipman and how the loss of memory can strip someone of their personality.
I'd have liked to have heard more about Maurice Lipman and how loss of memory can strip someone of their personality, but instead, what follows is a kind of Horizon-lite as Maureen goes on a quest to find out a bit more about how memories are stored - and can even be manipulated.
Critics, say, however, the bill is unconstitutional because it would potentially allow the government to strip someone of citizenship on mere suspicion and without a court trial.