strip of

strip (someone or something) of (something)

1. To remove some outer layer or covering from someone or something, especially in a rough or forceful manner. The incredible winds stripped our roof of a bunch of its tiles last night. I stripped him of his clothes and hurried him into the shower before the chemicals burned his body.
2. To remove, take, or steal something from someone or something, especially in a forceful or brutish manner; to deprive someone or something of something. The authoritarian government has been slowly stripping its citizens' of basic freedoms ever since it came into power. The federal regulators stripped the company of its accreditation after their investigation revealed numerous infractions. He was stripped of his rank for deserting his company during combat.
See also: of, strip

strip someone or something of something

to take something, such as status or property, away from someone or something. The court stripped him of all his property. We stripped him of his rights when we put him in jail.
See also: of, strip

strip of

v.
1. To deprive someone or something of some covering or ornament: The tornado stripped the tree of its leaves. The manuscript was stripped of its academic jargon.
2. To deprive someone of some honor, rank, office, privilege, or possession: Losing my job and my house stripped me of my dignity. The officers were court-martialed and stripped of their ranks.
See also: of, strip
References in classic literature ?
First there was a strip of light green silk, then a strip of dark green and then a strip of emerald green; for Oz had a fancy to make the balloon in different shades of the color about them.
Under this row of faint grease prints he would write a record on the strip of white paper--thus:
The same afternoon I descried the venerable warrior approaching the house, with a slow, stately gait, ear-rings in ears, and spear in hand, with this highly ornamental pair of shoes suspended from his neck by a strip of bark, and swinging backwards and forwards on his capacious chest.
With slow step and vacant face--moving as if she was walking in her sleep--she led the way to the papered wall; knelt down at the skirting-board; and, taking out two small sharp nails, lifted up a long strip of the paper which had been detached from the plaster beneath.
Partly by signs, and partly by help of the slate, she showed how the mixture could be applied to the back of the loosened strip of paper in the next room--how the paper could be glued to the sound lower part of the wall by tightening the strings--how the strings, having served that purpose, could be safely removed--how the same process could be followed in Geoffrey's room, after the hollowed place had been filled up again with the materials waiting in the scullery, or even without filling up the hollowed place if the time failed for doing it.
Leaning forward, he touched the farther end of the strip of brown stuff that she was hemming.
He drew up to the table again and she sewed on in silence, with dropped lashes, while he sat in fascinated contemplation of the way in which her hands went up and down above the strip of stuff, just as he had seen a pair of birds make short perpendicular flights over a nest they were building.
She sat silent, her hands clasped on her work, and it seemed to him that a warm current flowed toward him along the strip of stuff that still lay unrolled between them.
He took his nose out of the calabash and with his rose-ribbon strip of tongue licked Lamai's hand.
These include single strip of varying widths, simultaneous two-strip stacking, fully controlled stacking of endless sheet or perforated sheet, as well as automatic sheet cutting and stacking with or without foil separation.
The sensor consists of a 4-centimeter-long strip of the magnetoelastic alloy used in antitheft markers.
A strip of print with two plain strips of the same color makes a satisfactory braid.
In the first block of the first strip of "Doonesbury," the football-helmeted, stone-faced character sits in an armchair, with a blank college pennant hanging on the wall.
These areas could include some or all of the following: East Jerusalem and its surroundings, land along the length of the Green Line, especially at Israel's narrowest point and in the denser settlement areas, some of the high ground in the West Bank hills, and the strip of land on the West Bank's eastern frontier running parallel to the Jordan River.
The second is to produce the strips off-line, where a full width strip of rubber on a pallet is slit into narrow strips by a cold slitter and then wigwagged into a wire or plastic basket.