strike at (someone or something)

(redirected from strikes at)

strike at (someone or something)

1. To direct a blow at someone or something. The boy struck at the bully with his fist. I began striking at the blockage with a metal rod, trying to dislodge it from the pipe.
2. To attempt to impair, disable, or discredit some part or element of something. By cracking down on the opium trade, the task force is hoping to strike the main source of funding for the dictatorship. Their campaign has been striking at the incumbent senator's position on tax reform.
See also: strike
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

strike at someone or something

to hit at or toward someone or something. She struck at him, but he parried the blows. The bear struck at the branch, hoping to break it and get at the honey.
See also: strike
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The Victoria Typographical Association led strikes at The Argus in 1855 and The Age in 1858.
Also in 1975, there were lengthy printers' strikes at The Age and Fairfax newspapers over the introduction of tele-typesetting machines (Souter, 1981: 562-4).
Strikes at low altitudes were much more common than strikes at high altitude.
Aline's fictional actions are potentially full of meanings about the competing messages of employers and employees and the theater as a contested space, but these fictional actions pale in comparison to the real actions of workers during the same strikes at Klein's and Ohrbach's.
If the ump calls strikes at the knees, you don't swing at shoulder-high pitches.
Researchers have estimated the productivity effects of strikes at the industry level, with just own-industry strike information (Flaherty 1987; Neumann and Reder 1984).