stress

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Related to stresses: combined stresses

lay stress on (something)

To put particular emphasis on some topic, issue, or aspect. Our school is aiming to lay stress on individual styles of learning, rather than focusing on standardized tests and curriculum. Bring up the difficulties the project has faced, but make sure you lay stress on all the success you've had.
See also: lay, on, stress

no stress

1. That is not a problem; don't worry about it. A: "It looks like the file was deleted when the computer crashed." B: "No stress, there should be a backup copy." A: "Sorry about last night, I was out of line." B: "No stress, man. I know you didn't mean it."
2. I would be happy to. A: "Would you mind emptying the dishwasher for me?" B: "Sure, no stress."
See also: no, stress

stress out

1. To experience a lot of mental, emotional, or physical strain or tension. Now, don't stress out, but the boss has some things he wants you to change in the project. I can't believe he's stressing out about something so trivial.
2. To cause someone to experience a lot of mental, emotional, or physical strain or tension. This term paper has been really stressing me out—I just don't know what to write for it! Try not to stress your employees out, as it can affect both their productivity and, in turn, your revenue potential.
See also: out, stress

stressed out

Experiencing a lot of mental, emotional, or physical strain or tension. Now, don't get stressed out, but the boss has some things he wants you to change in the project. I've been really stressed out trying to figure out what to write for my term paper.
See also: out, stress

lay emphasis on something

 and lay stress on something
to place emphasis on something; to emphasize something. When you present this explanation, lay emphasis on the matter of personal responsibility. I'm afraid I laid too much stress on the notion of good attendance. If you are really sick, stay home!
See also: emphasis, lay, on

no stress

Inf. no problem; no bother. Don't worry, man, no stress. Relax. No stress. It doesn't bother me at all.
See also: no, stress

stress out

Subject to or undergo extreme pressure or strain, as from working. For example, I badly need a vacation; I'm just plain stressed out from this job and its aggravations. The verb stress has meant "afflict with hardship" or "distress" since the 16th century, but the phrase stress out, alluding to psychological stress, dates only from the 1940s.
See also: out, stress

stress out

v. Slang
1. To subject something to extreme stress, as from working too much: The tight deadlines are stressing out everybody in the office. I might not be cut out for this job; the demanding schedule stresses me out. Don't stress yourself out trying to finish the project; I'll take care of it.
2. To undergo extreme stress, as from working too much: You're always stressing out about things that can't be changed.
See also: out, stress

no stress

interj. no problem; no bother. Relax. No stress. It doesn’t bother me at all.
See also: no, stress

stress

1. in. to suffer annoyance; to experience stress. Clare finds that she is stressing more and more about little things.
2. tv. to annoy or bother someone. (see also stressed.) Don’t stress Willy! He’s had a hard day.

stressed

mod. upset; annoyed. Come on, man, don’t get stressed! It’s only a gag.
See also: stress
References in periodicals archive ?
It is seen that although the distance between the points 1 and 2 is very small, the surface stresses differ considerably.
Here a uniform hydrostatic pressure was superimposed on the shear stress, rather than the axial tensile and compressive stresses as used in the previous test series.
* size and shape of CSR samples are still to define; washers commonly used in the Jamak jig do not yield in uniform compressive stresses: also, exposure to fluids, amount of straining and thermal cycling are still not understood.
It has been realized that many properties of materials may be affected by interfacial and/or matrix residual stresses. The presence of residual stresses in epoxy resins may result in various defects, e.g.
During simulation of the casting processes, mold filling, solidification and microstructure formation were examined as well as the development of residual stresses caused during the casting process.
One task of professionals working with children who have physical disabilities is to assist mothers in helping their children manage the physical, social, academic, and emotional stresses of everyday life.
In other words, a system designed for short-term mobilization may be inadequate for handling the stresses of modern life, which tend to span longer periods and are often incompletely resolved, he suggests.
If you mold, form, or extrude clear plastics, you may have heard the Four Myths about evaluating residual stresses in products:
(If more than one type of stress is involved in the same section, the Principle of Superposition allows the individual stress types to be analyzed separately and then added together; once again, the larger of the stresses to be combined are usually from bending or torsion.)
t = principal true stresses (referred to the deformed dimensions),
Though this passive-cracking phenomenon has been linked since 1984 to stresses introduced during chip fabrication, the Cornell theory, published in the July 4 APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS, is the first to model the atomic behavior of chip lines under stress.
Breaking stresses and extensions in equibiaxial tension are often significantly greater than those in uniaxial tension (ref.
This thrust is evident in new software modules for analyzing gas-assisted injection, shrinkage, molded-in stresses, and molecular or fiber orientation.
Castings now must withstand higher static and dynamic stresses, higher temperatures and more corrosive environments.
Stranks (2005) also favors that all types of stresses are not bad for people.