strange

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be strange bedfellows

Of a pair of people, things, or groups paired together in a certain situation or activity, to be extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. The liberal comedian and the conservative pundit may be strange bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would be strange bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but their books actually have a lot of parallels in terms of themes and constructs.
See also: bedfellow, strange

feel strange

To feel uneasy or unwell. If you're feeling strange, why don't you sit down?
See also: feel, strange

How (something) is that?

That is very (something). Adjectives commonly used in this construction include "strange," "cool," and "awesome," among others. Did you know that hummingbirds can fly backwards? How cool is that? A: "Frank spent prom night home alone playing video games. How sad is that?" B: "Actually, that sounds pretty great."
See also: how

keep (some kind of) hours

1. To maintain a particular pattern or schedule of being awake and asleep. Because of the huge time difference, Sam has kept really strange hours since coming back from Japan. It's important that the kids start keeping regular hours when they are young, since having unpredictable bedtimes can cause a lot of problems with sleep.
2. To maintain particular business hours. The local doctor has always kept rather irregular hours. Sometimes it just comes down to luck whether he'll be there at all on a given day.
See also: hour, keep, kind

like a cat in a strange garret

Very wary or timid. Of course he's acting like a cat in a strange garret—he's never been to the big city before!
See also: cat, like, strange

make strange (with one)

To become shy or upset in the presence of one. Typically said of babies or young children. I can't believe he's not crying while you hold him—he usually makes strange with everyone! Don't make strange, go say hi to your Aunt Josephine!
See also: make, strange

make strange bedfellows

Of a pair of people, things, or groups paired together in a certain situation or activity, to be extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. The liberal comedian and the conservative pundit may make strange bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would make strange bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but their books actually have a lot of parallels in terms of themes and constructs.
See also: bedfellow, make, strange

odd bird

A rather unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of an odd bird, don't you think?
See also: bird, odd

politics makes strange bedfellows

The pursuit of a political agenda or advantage often results in people working together who would not otherwise normally socialize with one another. A prominent gun-rights advocate and a famous animal welfare activist have come together to champion the new legislation. Politics makes strange bedfellows.

strange bedfellows

A pair of people, things, or groups connected in a certain situation or activity but extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. A notorious playboy musician and an ultra-conservative media pundit may be strange bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would make strange bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but the books they've co-written actually work really well.
See also: bedfellow, strange

strange bird

A rather unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of a strange bird, don't you think?
See also: bird, strange

strange duck

A rather unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of a strange duck, don't you think?
See also: duck, strange

strange to say

Bafflingly; surprisingly; atypically. Strange to say, it turned out that we both knew John, but had met him in two different parts of the world. He seemed happy that the police caught him, strange to say. Their newest device, is strange to say, a slight step back when it comes to performance and design.
See also: say, strange

strangely enough

Bafflingly; surprisingly; atypically. Strangely enough, it turned out that we both knew John, but had met him in two different parts of the world. He seems, strangely enough, happy that the police caught him. Their newest device is strangely enough a slight step back when it comes to performance and design.
See also: enough, strangely

Politics makes strange bedfellows.

Prov. People who would normally dislike and avoid one another will work together if they think it is politically useful to do so. Jill: I never would have thought that genteel, aristocratic candidate would pick such a rabble-rousing, rough-mannered running mate. Jane: Politics makes strange bedfellows.

strange bedfellows

A peculiar alliance or combination, as in George and Arthur really are strange bedfellows, sharing the same job but totally different in their views . Although strictly speaking bedfellows are persons who share a bed, like husband and wife, the term has been used figuratively since the late 1400s. This particular idiom may have been invented by Shakespeare in The Tempest (2:2), "Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows." Today a common extension is politics makes strange bedfellows, meaning that politicians form peculiar associations so as to win more votes. A similar term is odd couple, a pair who share either housing or a business but are very different in most ways. This term gained currency with Neil Simon's Broadway play The Odd Couple and, even more, with the motion picture (1968) and subsequent television series based on it, contrasting housemates Felix and Oscar, one meticulously neat and obsessively punctual, the other extremely messy and casual.
See also: bedfellow, strange

strange to say

Also, strangely enough. Surprisingly, curiously, unaccountably, as in Strange to say, all the boys in his class are six feet tall or taller, or I've never been to the circus, strangely enough. This idiom was first recorded in 1697 as strange to relate.
See also: say, strange

make strange

(of a baby or child) fuss or be shy in company. Canadian
1987 Alice Munro The Progress of Love Her timid-looking fat son…usually liked Violet, but today he made strange.
See also: make, strange

feel ˈstrange

not feel comfortable in a situation; have an unpleasant physical feeling: She felt strange sitting at her father’s desk.It was terribly hot and I started to feel strange.
See also: feel, strange

be/make strange ˈbedfellows

be two very different people or things that you would not expect to find together: Art and rugby may seem strange bedfellows, but the local rugby club donated £5 000 to help fund an art exhibition.
A bedfellow is a person who shares a bed with somebody else.
See also: bedfellow, make, strange

odd bird

and strange bird
n. a strange or eccentric person. Mr. Wilson certainly is an odd bird. You’re a strange bird, but you’re fun.
See also: bird, odd

strange bird

verb
See also: bird, strange

strange bedfellows

An odd couple; a peculiar combination. Shakespeare appears to have originated the term, with his “Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows” (The Tempest, 2.2). Several centuries later, Edward Bulwer-Lytton wrote (The Caxtons, 1849), “Poverty has strange bedfellows.” Today we often say that politics makes strange bedfellows, meaning that politicians form odd associations in order to win more support or votes.
See also: bedfellow, strange
References in periodicals archive ?
Strangest tidbit: "I'm also here to tell you that men have pertinent needs that may overwrite the qualities they desire in a partner." Sometimes logic really does go out the window.
Also check out our list of the top 20 strangest hotel complaints.
Deb Campbell, Katy Nicholson, Pam Patrick and Vicky Vernon had a chat about their strangest tales at USalon in Gosforth's High Street.
Walking the red carpet at the British Academy Video Games Awards, television presenter and chat show host Jonathan Ross revealed the strangest thing he has ever done with a celebrity.
What is the strangest thing you've ever seen behind the scenes on a YPC tour?
Strangest lyrics in one of our songs: Nothing poetic really, it's just words that describe when rock'n'roll is been played.
The strangest man; the hidden life of Paul Dirac, mystic of the atom.
Strangest sight of the lot, though, was a live rabbit in the goalmouth when I was playing for Barnet against Yeovil.
A number of ghost pictures canal ready be seen on the site http://scienceof ghosts.wordpress.com One of the strangest appears to be the face of a little girl poking between the legs of a group of friends.
London, Nov 21 (ANI): King of pop Michael Jackson is being sued by sheikh Abdulla Al-Khalifa over strangest of things, including the singer's favourite ice-cream.
"I've been in the fire service for 14 years and without doubt it's the strangest call I have ever received," said Mr Furber.
In October 1973, he was 33 and working as an explosives expert when he was called to the strangest job of his career.
Helen asked what was the strangest thing Tim Burton had ever asked Johnny to do for a movie.
The winner of the Diagram Prize, an award which recognises the strangest book title of the year, has been named as The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification by Julian Montague.