straight ticket

(redirected from straight tickets)
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straight ticket

A voting ballot in which all the candidates voted for in a particular election are of the same political party. To be honest, I don't know the policies of anyone besides the presidential candidate, so I always just vote a straight ticket.
See also: straight, ticket

straight ticket

All the candidates of a single political party, as in Are you going to vote a straight ticket again? [Mid-1800s] Also see split ticket.
See also: straight, ticket
References in periodicals archive ?
In Harris County, Democratic straight tickets accounted for 35.3 percent of the overall vote, while in Dallas, straight-ticket Democrats cast 41.3 percent of the overall vote.
"I think the bill's author got here on the basis of straight ticket voting," Dutton said.
That's why the latest GOP effort to return to the days of straight tickets --HB 143--is so transparent.
The five-team group, which includes the UAE, is engaged in a heated competition for two straight tickets to South Africa, hosts of the World Cup Finals in the summer of next year.
Travis County, where 52.9 percent of voters cast straight tickets, was the lowest.
And in both places, Republican straight ticket voting fell a bit in 2008, rose in 2012 and fell again this year; GOP voters accounted for a bigger share in both places in 2004 than they did this year.
Straight tickets were eliminated in 2007, and since then certain Republicans have been nostalgic for the days when people could just check off the GOP box at the top of the ballot and get it over with.
Dan Patrick urge Harris County Republicans to vote straight tickets. (Cruz has also done robocalls for four specific candidates outside Texas: Blunt, Fleming and U.S.
This may be somewhat ironic, given the fact that the Democratic majority largely is the result of straight tickets being cast for Democratic candidates, but it long has been a belief of Democrats in the Legislature that straight-ticket voting is a bad practice.
However, whether voters intended to eliminate straight tickets when they voted in November is unknown.
Straight tickets account for as much as 30 percent of the vote in some Texas counties.