stoop to


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stoop to (something)

To do something below a certain standard of dignity, principles, or integrity. Don't stoop to his level. Just ignore him. I can't believe he would stoop to spreading gossip like that. I lost faith in the news site when they stooped to posting vacuous, clickbait-driven trash articles.
See also: stoop, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

stoop to

Condescend to something beneath one's dignity, as in She wouldn't stoop to listening to that obnoxious gossip. [Second half of 1500s]
See also: stoop, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stoop to

v.
To do something degrading or reprehensible to achieve one's ends: It's a shame that the museum has to stoop to cheap gimmicks in order to attract visitors.
See also: stoop, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Is there no depth Cameron and his cronies will not stoop to in their attempts to scare the voters of this country into voting to remain in the EU.
That bare form could be quite useful, given that Stoop To Conquer was formerly a decent staying handicapper on the Flat and he was well fancied to make a winning hurdle debut at Ludlow.
A strong breeze helped give Doncaster the early play but Lions broke from a scrum, Jon Boden putting in Sam Stoop to make it 5-0 on six minutes.
England's coach Stuart Lancaster was among the sold-out crowd at The Stoop to cast an eye over Harlequins' exciting youngsters.
'Stoop To Conquer will act on the ground and stays well.
But organised racism is one of the most shameful activities a community member can stoop to.