steal the show

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steal the show

To become the main focus of attention or deliver the most captivating performance in the presence of one or more others, typically unexpectedly. The opening band totally stole the show tonight—they were amazing. I'm sorry, I was trying to listen to your speech, but your adorable little sister stole the show when she came prancing out here.
See also: show, steal

steal the show

Also, steal the spotlight. Be the center of attention, as in The speeches were interesting but Eliza's singing stole the show. This idiom alludes to unexpectedly outshining the rest of the cast in a theatrical production. [First half of 1900s]
See also: show, steal

steal the show

COMMON If someone or something in a show or other event steals the show, they are more impressive or amusing than anyone or anything else and, as a result, get more attention or praise. All three singers gave impressive performances but it was Domingo who stole the show. It's Jack Lemmon who finally steals the show, turning in his finest performance in years. Note: You can describe someone or something that gets more attention than other people or things as a show-stealer. The show-stealer at Citywalk, however, isn't some Hollywood megastar, but a giant gorilla that hangs like King Kong from the front of the store.
See also: show, steal

steal the show

attract the most attention and praise.
See also: show, steal

steal the ˈshow

attract more attention and praise than other people in a particular situation: Actors don’t like working with animals because they often steal the show.
See also: show, steal
References in periodicals archive ?
But the most memorable impression of this year's awards has to be the calibre of the winners, in particular, the young entrepreneurs who stole the show with their honesty, spirit and humour.
Despite a rain-soaked track, conditions were perfect for the young guns in the semi-finals of the Invoshire Puppy Stakes at Walthamstow last night, in which Linda Mullins stole the show by winning the opening two semis.
But it was Barbara who stole the show when Scott, 37, paid a romantic visit to her hotel.
To say that he stole the show would be an exaggeration, with newcomers like Errin Dilly and Melissa Rain Anderson on view, but young Williams with his fancy footwork was a particular asset to this enjoyable revival, ingenuously directed and choreographed by Kathleen Marshall.
Daniel Peacock "stole the show" when he spoke at a packed Conservative Party conference telling how he had put his troubled life in order thanks to a Teesside charity.
Former Corrie star Eric Potts who stole the show in A Midsummer Night's Dream at Stafford Castle.
Butler shot to fame four years ago as Spartan King Leonidas in 300, when his toned muscles stole the show in the big-budget production.
A LIVERPOOL schoolgirl with a heart defect stole the show from Stevie Wonder, left, and a galaxy of stars at a New York concert.
Tom stole the show and some of his music was broadcast on the station alongside other winners last week.
CRICKET: Adam Hollioake stole the show on his return to the Oval, taking a hat-trick for the International XI as they beat an Asian side by six wickets in the Tsunami Relief Twenty20 match which raised more than pounds 1million last night.
The Jackson family stole the show at the Border Belgian Blue Club's annual open calf show in Carlisle, when nearly all 40 catalogued entries were forward for judging.
There's no doubt about it, in investment sales, individual investors stole the show in 2004.
But Danny Murphy's fiancee, Joanna Taylor, stole the show as she strutted down the catwalk.
Lopez steals the show in New York JENNIFER Lopez stole the show today at this year's VH1 Fashion Awards in New York.
They reached the Top 10 in 1982 with Rip it Up, and a couple of other songs almost made the Top 40, but Adam and the Ants, and the following New Romantic movement, shamelessly stole the show. Still, they carried on regardless, with their last hit aptly entitled Lean Period, until Edwyn Collins went solo in 1984.