stole


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steal a march over (someone or something)

To gain an unexpected or surreptitious advantage over someone or something, as by accomplishing something before, or better than, someone else. The retail business managed to steal a march over its competitors by signing an exclusive export agreement with Europe. John and I were both trying to win Courtney's heart, but he stole a march over me when he managed to get tickets to see Courtney's favorite band.
See also: march, over, steal

steal a march upon (someone or something)

To gain an unexpected or surreptitious advantage over someone or something, as by accomplishing something before, or better than, someone else. The retail business managed to steal a march upon its competitors by signing an exclusive export agreement with Europe. John and I were both trying to win Courtney's heart, but he stole a march upon me when he managed to get tickets to see Courtney's favorite band.
See also: march, steal, upon

steal the march over (someone or something)

To gain an unexpected or surreptitious advantage over someone or something, as by accomplishing something before, or better than, someone else. The retail business managed to steal the march over its competitors by signing an exclusive export agreement with Europe. John and I were both trying to win Courtney's heart, but he stole the march over me when he managed to get tickets to see Courtney's favorite band.
See also: march, over, steal

steal the march upon (someone or something)

To gain an unexpected or surreptitious advantage over someone or something, as by accomplishing something before, or better than, someone else. The retail business managed to steal the march upon its competitors by signing an exclusive export agreement with Europe. John and I were both trying to win Courtney's heart, but he stole the march upon me when he managed to get tickets to see Courtney's favorite band.
See also: march, steal, upon

steal the march on (someone or something)

To gain an unexpected or surreptitious advantage over someone or something, as by accomplishing something before, or better than, someone else. The retail business managed to steal the march on its competitors by signing an exclusive export agreement with Europe. John and I were both trying to win Courtney's heart, but he stole the march on me when he managed to get tickets to see Courtney's favorite band.
See also: march, on, steal

steal a march on (someone or something)

To gain an unexpected or surreptitious advantage over someone or something, as by accomplishing something before, or better than, someone else. The retail business managed to steal a march on its competitors by signing an exclusive export agreement with Europe. John and I were both trying to win Courtney's heart, but he stole a march on me when he managed to get tickets to Courtney's favorite band.
See also: march, on, steal

steal a march

To gain an unexpected or surreptitious advantage over someone or something, as by accomplishing something before, or better than, someone else. The retail business managed to steal a march on its competitors by signing an exclusive export agreement with Europe. John and I were both trying to win Courtney's heart, but he stole a march when he managed to get tickets to Courtney's favorite band.
See also: march, steal

steal the show

To become the main focus of attention or deliver the most captivating performance in the presence of one or more others, typically unexpectedly. The opening band totally stole the show tonight—they were amazing. I'm sorry, I was trying to listen to your speech, but your adorable little sister stole the show when she came prancing out here.
See also: show, steal

steal (one's) heart

To captivate someone; to instill in someone a deep affection or love. The young actress has stolen the nation's heart. I'm married, and I know this is wrong, but you've stolen my heart.
See also: heart, steal

steal (one's) thunder

1. To divert attention or praise away from someone else or their accomplishments and toward oneself. My brother is the star athlete of our high school, so no matter what I succeed in, he's constantly stealing my thunder.
2. To steal someone's idea, plan, or patent and use it for one's own advantage. We had the idea for "digital paper" years ago, but I see they've stolen our thunder and have their own version of it on the market.
See also: steal, thunder

like the cat that stole the cream

Obviously smug or overly pleased with oneself. After her promotion, Janet spent the rest of the day looking like the cat that got the cream.
See also: cat, cream, like, stole, that

steal a glance (at someone or something)

To look at someone or something very quickly and discreetly. That boy just stole a glance at you again! I think he likes you! I stole a glance to see if the teacher was watching us.
See also: glance, someone, steal

steal a look (at someone or something)

To look at someone or something very quickly and discreetly. That boy just stole a look at you again! I think he likes you! I stole a look to see if the teacher was watching us.
See also: look, someone, steal

steal a kiss

To kiss someone very quickly and discreetly. They stole a kiss on the steps before Sarah's parents opened the door to meet John for the first time.
See also: kiss, steal

steal (someone's) clothes

To advance or appropriate someone else's ideas, policies, or agendas as one's own. Many believe the challenger is really trying to steal the incumbent's clothes and beat him at his own game.
See also: clothes, steal

steal the show

Also, steal the spotlight. Be the center of attention, as in The speeches were interesting but Eliza's singing stole the show. This idiom alludes to unexpectedly outshining the rest of the cast in a theatrical production. [First half of 1900s]
See also: show, steal

steal a march

COMMON If you steal a march on someone, you do something before them and so gain an advantage over them. Investors from other countries will be annoyed that their rivals have once again stolen a march on them.. In the 1980s, they stole a march on other Europeans by attracting massive amounts of foreign investment. Note: If an army steals a march on the enemy, it moves secretly and takes the enemy by surprise.
See also: march, steal

steal the show

COMMON If someone or something in a show or other event steals the show, they are more impressive or amusing than anyone or anything else and, as a result, get more attention or praise. All three singers gave impressive performances but it was Domingo who stole the show. It's Jack Lemmon who finally steals the show, turning in his finest performance in years. Note: You can describe someone or something that gets more attention than other people or things as a show-stealer. The show-stealer at Citywalk, however, isn't some Hollywood megastar, but a giant gorilla that hangs like King Kong from the front of the store.
See also: show, steal

steal the show

attract the most attention and praise.
See also: show, steal

like the ˌcat that got, stole, etc. the ˈcream

very pleased or satisfied with yourself: Ever since she won that prize, she’s been like the cat that got the cream.
See also: cat, cream, like, that

steal a ˈkiss (from somebody)

(literary) kiss somebody suddenly or secretly: This is the place where he first stole a kiss from me, when I was only twelve.
See also: kiss, steal

steal the ˈshow

attract more attention and praise than other people in a particular situation: Actors don’t like working with animals because they often steal the show.
See also: show, steal
References in periodicals archive ?
Eight of the sixteen major league teams stole 40 or fewer bases in 1950, and the St.
The 1953 Brooklyn Dodgers stole 90, while the 1957-59 Chicago White Sox stole more than 100 bases in each season.
BIRDS OF A FEATHER "This stole was designed and crafted by the artisans of the River Collective of Oakville, Ont.
OUT OF AFRICA "My favourite vestment, this African stole, is that of a special friend.
JACKSON BRIDGE: Friday June 26 - Thieves forced entry to shed and stole strimmer.
Dave Hansen led off with a bloop single to center, and pinch runner Willie Bloomquist stole second.
HONLEY: Monday April 13 - Burglars forced entry to office at Hagg Wood Stone Quarry, Woodhead Road, and stole power tools and keys for other units.
MELTHAM: Tuesday April 14 - Burglar entered through unlocked door and stole car keys and Mercedes.
SKELMANTHORPE: March 6, stole trousers from washing line.
Feb 26 - Thieves stole large paving stones from hedgerow and fled in Fiat Doblo van reg: WN14 LLV.
Outfielder Victor Hall stole 60 bases at Single-A South Bend (Ind.
Friday January 16 - Burglar smashed glass in side door, entered and stole computer equipment and camera.
On Tuesday, Spencer and Bonnie Berg discovered someone stole the 8-foot-by-5-foot flag that had covered the casket of her father, Roy Gohl, an Army and Merchant Marine World War II veteran who died last year.
HOLMFIRTH: January 6 - Burglar forced rear window, entered and stole jewellery and tablet.
NETHERTON: Dec 18 - Burglar smashed glass in door, entered and stole electrical items and jewellery.