stock phrase

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stock phrase

A well-known, overused phrase; a cliché. As this is a creative writing class, I don't want to see any stock phrases in your stories. Please rewrite this paragraph in your own words, instead of using stock phrases like "think outside the box."
See also: phrase, stock
References in classic literature ?
Philip smiled, for this was one of his uncle's stock phrases.
"The individual, in such cases, is nearly always sacrificed to what is supposed to be the collective interest: people cling to any convention that keeps the family together--protects the children, if there are any," he rambled on, pouring out all the stock phrases that rose to his lips in his intense desire to cover over the ugly reality which her silence seemed to have laid bare.
His father has provided salient advice for Wan-Bissaka during his rise, with one of his stock phrases being: "Good, but just keep going and keep working hard, it doesn't stop here." Those words will be ringing in his son's ears as his United adventure gets under way.
I know, let's train them all in three or four plain stock phrases. Easy.
We often come out with stock phrases like "time heals" when someone has experienced trauma, but the reality is you never forget.
As a party in power that wants to rule the country forever, the BJP has restricted itself to a few stock phrases when Opposition parties, and especially Rahul Gandhi, criticises it.
It's not complicated -- avoid stock phrases, and just say you are thinking of them and that you understand and feel sad for them.
Rehearse stock phrases Practise what you want to say when the people in your life try to lure you into temptation.
After Trump labeled the EU a "foe," Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, responded on Twitter, using one of Trump's favorite stock phrases.
Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, replied on Twitter using one of Trump's favorite stock phrases. "America and the EU are best friends," Tusk wrote.
Actually what is striking about them is their cliched nature - he has a fondness for stock phrases."
And so "[t]o be liberal no longer means simply to believe in principles of justice and fairness but to exhibit certain acceptable behaviors, feel emotions that are expected of you, and repeat certain stock phrases." (203)
My German oral exam was a disaster: 20 minutes spent speaking in a faux Allo, Allo accent, peppered with such stock phrases as "Achtung", "Heinkel" and "Schweinhund".
"On the subject of failure, one of my dad's other stock phrases was: 'Th'as made a reight Honley Feast on it'.
I think his analysis was a little off-beam in questioning the use of so-called stock phrases. What's wrong with them?