stock


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not take stock in (something)

To not pay any attention to something; to have or invest no faith or belief in something; to not accept something. I wouldn't take stock in John's promises if I were you because, more often than not, he'll end up letting you down. I don't know how a company expects its managers to perform well when it doesn't take stock in their abilities.
See also: not, stock, take

not put stock in (something)

To not pay any attention to something; to have or invest no faith or belief in something; to not accept something. I wouldn't put stock in John's promises if I were you because, more often than not, he'll end up letting you down. I don't know how the company expects its managers to perform well when it doesn't put stock in their abilities.
See also: not, put, stock

put no stock in (something)

To not pay any attention to something; to have or invest no faith or belief in something; to not accept something. You'll put no stock in John's promises if you know what's good for you because, more often than not, he'll end up letting you down. I don't know how the company expects its managers to perform well when it puts no stock in their abilities.
See also: put, stock

laughing stock

A person who is the subject of mockery after a blunder. If I mess up this speech, I'll be the laughing stock of the school!
See also: laugh, stock

stand stock still

To not move at all. You kids need to stand stock still out here until the firemen are done investigating the building, OK? I didn't want my grandmother to catch me rooting through her jewelry box, so when I heard her in the hallway, I leaped into the closet and stood stock still.
See also: stand, still, stock

stock phrase

A well-known, overused phrase; a cliché. As this is a creative writing class, I don't want to see any stock phrases in your stories. Please rewrite this paragraph in your own words, instead of using stock phrases like "think outside the box."
See also: phrase, stock

put stock in

To pay attention to something; to have or invest faith or belief in something; to accept something. Often used in the negative. Oh, John is very dependable—I would put stock in his promises. Our managers put stock in their employees' abilities, and I think that definitely contributes to our company's success. Don't put stock in their criticism—they're just jealous.
See also: put, stock

lock, stock, and barrel

Entirely or completely. Much to his wife's surprise, he cleaned out the basement, lock, stock, and barrel. When my son came home from his football game, he was so hungry that he ate everything in the refrigerator, lock, stock, and barrel.
See also: and, barrel

take no stock in (something)

To not pay any attention to something; to have or invest no faith or confidence in something; to not accept something. You'll take no stock in John's promises if you know what's good for you, because more often than not he'll end up letting you down. I don't know how a company expects its managers to perform well when it takes no stock in their abilities.
See also: stock, take

have (something) in stock

to have merchandise available and ready for sale. Do you have extra large sizes in stock? Of course, we have all sizes and colors in stock.
See also: have, stock

in stock

to have merchandise available and ready for sale. Do you have extra-large sizes in stock? Of course, we have all sizes and colors in stock.
See also: stock

lock, stock, and barrel

Cliché everything. We had to move everything out of the house—lock, stock, and barrel. We lost everything—lock, stock, and barrel—in the fire.
See also: and, barrel

out of stock

not immediately available in a store; [for goods] to be temporarily unavailable. Those items are out of stock, but a new supply will be delivered on Thursday. I'm sorry, but the red ones are out of stock. Would a blue one do?
See also: of, out, stock

stock in trade

whatever goods, skills, etc., are necessary to undertake an activity of some kind. Of course I am glad to help. Packing household goods is my stock in trade.
See also: stock, trade

stock something (up) with something

to load something with a supply of something. Let's stock the wine cellar with good vintages this year. We will stock up our wine cellar with whatever is on sale.
See also: stock

stock up (with something)

to build up a supply of something. You had better stock up with firewood before the first snowstorm. Yes, I will stock up today.
See also: stock, up

stock up (with something)

to build up a supply of something. You had better stock up with firewood before the first snowstorm. Yes, I will stock up today.
See also: stock, up

take no stock in something

 and not take stock in something; not put (a lot) of stock in something
to pay no attention to someone; not to believe or accept something. I take no stock in anything John has to say. He doesn't take stock in your opinions either.
See also: stock, take

take stock (of something)

to make an appraisal of resources and potentialities. I spent some time yesterday taking stock of my good and bad qualities. We all need to take stock now and then.
See also: stock, take

cross as a bear

Grumpy, ill-humored, annoyed, as in Stay away from Claire; she's cross as a bear this morning. Unlike the earlier cross as two stocks, this survives even though the adjective cross for "ill-tempered" is otherwise not used much in America. It is sometimes amplified as cross as a bear with a sore head. [Early 1700s]
See also: bear, cross

in stock

Available for sale or use, on hand, as in We have several dozen tires in stock. The antonym, out of stock, means "not available for sale," usually only temporarily. For example, This item is out of stock now, but we expect a new order next week. [Early 1600s]
See also: stock

lock, stock, and barrel

The entirety; all of something. For example, Jean moved out of the house, lock, stock, and barrel. This expression alludes to the three elements of a firearm-the lock or firing mechanism, the stock or handle, and the barrel or tube. [Early 1800s]
See also: and, barrel

out of stock

see under in stock.
See also: of, out, stock

take stock

Make an estimate or appraisal, as in We have to take stock of our finances before we can undertake a new project, or The career counselor advised Mark to take stock before changing his plans. This expression transfers making an inventory of goods ( stock) to other kinds of appraisal. [Early 1800s]
See also: stock, take

take stock in

Trust, believe, attach importance to, as in He exaggerates so much that I don't take stock in anything he says. This term uses stock in the sense of "capital." [Second half of 1800s]
See also: stock, take

lock, stock, and barrel

COMMON You use lock, stock, and barrel to talk about every part of something. It would have been much easier for us to have shut the business down lock, stock and barrel. He has moved down from the north-east, lock, stock and barrel. Note: The three main parts which make up a complete gun are the lock, the stock, and the barrel.
See also: and, barrel

a laughing stock

If you describe someone or something as a laughing stock, you mean that people think they are silly. The truth must never get out. If it did she would be a laughing stock. His policies became the laughing stock of the financial community.
See also: laugh, stock

stock up

v.
1. To provide or furnish something with supplies: The bartender stocked up the bar with vodka. We stocked the house up with emergency supplies.
2. stock up on To gather and store a supply of something: We stocked up on canned goods before the storm came.
See also: stock, up

deal stock

n. a stock that is a takeover candidate. (Securities markets.) I try to spot the deal stocks early and buy them before others do.
See also: deal, stock

story stock

n. shares in a company that are bought because of an appealing story about the company. I never buy a story stock. By the time I hear about it, it’s already gone up as much as it ever will.
See also: stock, story

lock, stock, and barrel

To the greatest or most complete extent; wholly: an estate that was auctioned off lock, stock, and barrel.
See also: and, barrel

take stock

1. To take an inventory.
2. To make an estimate or appraisal, as of resources or of oneself.
See also: stock, take

take stock in

To trust, believe in, or attach importance to.
See also: stock, take

in stock

Available for sale or use; on hand.
See also: stock

out of stock

Not available for sale or use.
See also: of, out, stock

lock, stock, and barrel

The whole thing. A musket was made up of a flintlock mechanism that produced the power to launch the ball, a wooden stock that held the lock and the barrel, and the barrel through which the musket ball was propelled en route to its target. Put all three together and you have the whole shooting match. The phrase was first used in the early 19th century to mean an entire entity or quantity.
See also: and, barrel
References in periodicals archive ?
Number of shares of each class of acquirer stock, the amount of money and the other property to be exchanged for all of the target stock (in the aggregate), or for each share of target stock;
Percentage of the number of shares of each class of target stock, or the percentage (by value) of the target stock, to be exchanged for acquirer stock, provided that the target stock to be exchanged for acquirer stock and the target stock to be exchanged for cash or other property each represent an economically reasonable exchange; or
Companies should offer mandatory education sessions for all employees and counsel specific employees who have too much company stock in their plan accounts.
Stock options will and should continue to be a major component of executive compensation, given the potential for superior long-term wealth-creation power for executives and the benefits for shareholders.
That is, compensation cost arising from the issuance of stock options may be expensed or capitalized in the same way as cash compensation.
People who borrowed most of the money to buy a stock often found that if it lost too much value, the broker would have to sell it.
Selling covered equity call options is probably most appropriate for investors who can and will sell their stock at the option's strike price and who want the opportunity to enhance their income from a stock position.
A few years ago," says Arinwine, "I was almost entirely invested in stock funds.
Many people who think they have little in the way of disposable income may have considerable stock holdings that they've acquired through inheritance or regular contributions to a mutual fund.
Their worst stock is Dell, on which they lost $2,162.
In addition, the extent to which NQPS will be treated as property other than stock under the Code should be clarified.
The above discussion on the effect of rubber stock scorch time on adhesion may lead to the inference that going to a higher temperature, faster cure of natural rubber stocks, particularly without the inclusion of SBR in the compound, may result in reduced adhesion.
Occasionally, warnings are heard in the newsabout stock index futures and their relationship to computerized "program trading," usually when the stock market's euphoria is interrupted by a brief plunge, like the 116-point dive it took in 71 minutes on January 23.
To mark the signing of the Memorandum, the CEO of Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, Ms Ester Levanon, today opened trading at the London Stock.
After the acquisition, at least 60% of such foreign corporation's stock (determined by vote or value) is held by former shareholders of the domestic corporation (or former partners of the domestic partnership); and