stitch

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go through-stitch

To follow through or finish something. My brother has a hard time sticking with the things he starts, but he seems to enjoy football—maybe he'll go through-stitch with it.

a stitch in time (saves nine)

An action taken now will prevent problems later. You should consider getting your car repaired now before you're left stranded on the side of the road—a stitch in time saves nine. I know it's a month away, but I already started preparing for the big dinner party. A stitch in time, you know.
See also: stitch, time

have (one) in stitches

To cause one to laugh hysterically. That guy always has me in stitches—he's a great stand-up comic.
See also: have, stitch

in stitches

Laughing very hard, to the point that one cannot control it. Jerry is the funniest guy I know. He can have you in stitches in a matter of minutes. I was in stitches at that comedy show. I could barely breathe it was so funny.
See also: stitch

with not a stitch on

Totally nude. As I walked into the kitchen, I saw my roommate by the counter with not a stitch on. I nearly dropped my mug of tea! The actor recently did a magazine shoot with not a stitch on, which has had plenty of people going crazy online.
See also: not, on, stitch

not have a stitch on

To be totally nude. My roommate didn't have a stitch on as I walked into the kitchen. I nearly dropped my mug of tea!
See also: have, not, on, stitch

in stitches

Fig. laughing very hard. Charlie had us in stitches with all his jokes. The movie sure was funny. I was in stitches!
See also: stitch

keep someone in stitches

Fig. to cause someone to laugh loud and hard, for a period of time. The comedian kept us in stitches for nearly an hour. The teacher kept the class in stitches, but the students didn't learn anything.
See also: keep, stitch

not have a stitch of clothes (on)

Fig. naked. He walked through the house and didn't have a stitch of clothes on.
See also: clothes, have, not, of, stitch

stitch in time saves nine

Prov. If you fix a small problem right away, it will not become a bigger problem later. Let's patch the roof before that hole gets bigger. A stitch in time saves nine.
See also: nine, save, stitch, time

stitch something onto something

 and stitch something on
to sew something onto the surface of something else. Fred stitched the badge onto his jacket. Fred stitched on the badge.
See also: stitch

stitch something up

to sew something together; to mend a tear or ripped seam. I tore my shirt. Would you stitch it up, please? Please stitch up my shirt.
See also: stitch, up

in stitches

Laughing uncontrollably, as in Joke after joke had me in stitches. Although the precise idiom dates only from about 1930, Shakespeare had a similar expression in Twelfth Night (3:2): "If you desire the spleen, and will laugh yourselves into stitches, follow me." Stitches here refers to the sharp local pain (known as a stitch in the side) that can make one double over, much as a fit of laughter can.
See also: stitch

stitch in time, a

A prompt action will avert more serious trouble. For example, Changing the car's oil every 7,000 miles is a stitch in time. The complete form of this adage, a stitch in time saves nine, appeared in Thomas Fuller's 1732 proverb collection, Gnomologia, and is so well known that it often is stated in shortened form. Ogden Nash played with it in the title for his verse collection, A Stitch Too Late Is My Fate (1938).
See also: stitch

without a stitch on

Naked, as in They let their baby run around outside without a stitch on. A related phrase is not have a stitch on. These expressions use stitch in the sense of "a piece of clothing," a usage dating from the early 1800s.
See also: on, stitch, without

a stitch in time

If someone says a stitch in time, they mean that it is better to deal with a problem in its early stages, in order to prevent it getting worse. As for the paintwork, paint over any small areas that have flaked off and save yourself a bigger job later on. A stitch in time. Note: This expression comes from the proverb a stitch in time saves nine, which can also be used in full. Meanwhile, it was announced that interest rates were rising now to prevent bigger rises later. It was, said Mr George, a case of `a stitch in time saves nine'.
See also: stitch, time

in stitches

INFORMAL
If you are in stitches, you are laughing a lot. It was so funny — we were in stitches. Note: You can also say that you have someone in stitches, meaning that you make them laugh a lot. Thea had us in stitches with her tales of her family.
See also: stitch

a stitch in time

if you sort out a problem immediately, it may save a lot of extra work later. proverb
The fuller form of the expression is a stitch in time saves nine. Nine here has no particular significance as a number but was chosen because of its similarity in sound with the word time .
See also: stitch, time

in stitches

laughing uncontrollably. informal
Stitch, in the sense of ‘a sudden localized jabbing pain’, such as might be caused by a needle, is recorded in Old English. It is now generally used of a muscle spasm in the side caused especially by exertion. Shakespeare seems to have been the first to describe stitches brought on by laughter; in Twelfth Night ( 1601 ) Maria invites her fellow conspirators to observe the lovelorn Malvolio with the words: ‘If you…will laugh yourselves into stitches, follow me’.
1981 D. M. Thomas The White Hotel She had them in stitches with her absurd—but true— anecdotes.
See also: stitch

not have a stitch ˈon

,

without a stitch ˈon

(informal) have no clothes on; be naked: When he came into my room, I didn’t have a stitch on. I was so embarrassed!We left our clothes along the river bank and went swimming without a stitch on.
See also: have, not, on, stitch

a ˌstitch in ˈtime (saves ˈnine)

(saying) if you act immediately when something goes wrong, it will save you a lot more work later, because the problem will get worse if you leave it: We’d better fix that leak before it does any permanent damage. A stitch in time...
See also: stitch, time

in ˈstitches

(informal) laughing a lot: The film had the audience in stitches.
See also: stitch

stitch up

v.
1. To mend or repair something with or as if with stitches: The tailor stitched up the rip in the jacket. The cut over my eye was deep, but the doctor stitched it up in a matter of minutes.
2. To reach some official agreement: I've stitched up a deal with my mechanic so that I pay only for parts and not labor. The agreement was easy to make; we stitched it up in a day.
See also: stitch, up

a stitch

1. n. a very funny person. Harry is a stitch. What a sense of humor!
2. n. a sharp pain, usually in the side. I got a stitch and had to drop out of the marathon.
See also: stitch

in stitches

Informal
Laughing uncontrollably.
See also: stitch
References in periodicals archive ?
When you graft the toes of socks, you join the first half of the round to the second half of the same round, which means that you are joining the tops of stitches on the front needle to the tops of stitches on the back needle.
Design custom stitches by modifying stitch length and width on the machine.
However, there's no need to throw it away, as Stitches can help.
I think my favorites of these delicate, lacy stitches may be a blue fan created with Cluster (CL) and Double Cluster (dCL) as well as chains and double crochet (dc) comprised of 5 rows set upon a chain of 10 +4 stitches repeated across and down as the work continues.
If you just appreciate the cross-stitch motif without picking up needle and thread, consider the Stitches collection from Danish firm Menu.
Chandler advises stitchers to make a sampler book to practice the different stitches before using them on a project, which makes a fun and practical reference for later.
Runners who develop stitches are commonly advised to slow down and take deep, controlled breaths.
70 percent women who give birth vaginally need stitches if their perineum (the muscles and skin between the vagina and the anus) is damaged.
Eighty-five hours and 25,511 crochet stitches later, Osinga had a Lorenz manifold almost a meter tall and about 25 centimeters in diameter, which now hangs in the pair's house as a decoration.
From that, the nonprofit Stitches From the Heart program has grown nationwide to more than 6,200 knitters, who have donated more than 200,000 items to 432 hospitals and shelters.
After students choose a stitch or combination of stitches to applique the body, they remove the pins.
Some of the stitches I do when I cross-stitch are actually like practice for when I suture somebody up," he said.
In addition, the child is scared -- and afraid he may need stitches.
Keeping your stitches 1/4" apart, place three or four stitches in each of the large holes in the nut.
With her monochromatic activity, she stitches the stitched, calling attention to fragility with the most delicate of means.