sting

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sting in the tail

A disappointing ending to something, such as a story, that is otherwise upbeat and positive. The movie began as a sweet, romantic love story, so the tragic ending was an unexpected sting in the tail.
See also: sting, tail

take the sting out of (something)

To alleviate the pain or annoyance caused by something. Well, coming home to freshly baked cookies somewhat took the sting out of getting another parking ticket.
See also: of, out, sting, take

sting (one) to the quick

To deeply emotionally hurt or offend one. The comments stung me to the quick, but I remained composed and carried on with the lecture.
See also: quick, sting

sting (one) for (something)

To force one to pay a large amount of money, especially when that sum is surprising or seems unfair. The mechanic stung me for nearly $800 for various repairs when all I wanted him to do was change the oil. I was stung for a huge tax bill because of the money I won last summer.
See also: sting

sting someone for something

Sl. to cheat someone of a particular amount; to make someone pay for something. That guy stung me for twenty bucks! Toby was stung for the lunch bill.
See also: sting

sting someone with something

to use something to sting someone. The bee stung me with its stinger. The wasp can sting you with its poisonous barb.
See also: sting

take the sting out of

Lessen the severity or unpleasantness of something, as in That senior citizen discount took the sting out of the airfares. [Mid-1800s]
See also: of, out, sting, take

a sting in the tail

BRITISH
COMMON If something such as a remark or a plan has a sting in the tail, it seems good at first but contains an unpleasant part at the end. Even the remark about Chomsky being `arguably the most important intellectual alive' had a sting in its tail. The sentence went on: `how can he write such nonsense about international affairs?' The increased tax rate was an unexpected sting in the tail in an otherwise acceptable Budget. Note: This is a reference to a scorpion, which is small and looks harmless, but has a poisonous sting in its tail.
See also: sting, tail

take the sting out of something

If something takes the sting out of an unpleasant situation, it makes it less unpleasant. His calmness surprised her and helped to take the sting out of her anger. One of the best ways to take the sting out of things is put a humorous angle on it.
See also: of, out, something, sting, take

sting in the tail

an unpleasant or problematic end to something.
1992 Ronald Wright Stolen Continents At last Hendrick came to the sting in the tail of his speech.
See also: sting, tail

a ˌsting in the ˈtail

(informal) an unpleasant feature that comes at the end of a story, an event, etc: Roald Dahl’s stories often have a sting in the tail; that’s why I like them.
See also: sting, tail

take the ˈsting out of something

(of a situation) take away the part that is unpleasant or dangerous: We can pay the electricity bill in monthly instalments if we want, which takes the sting out of it.
See also: of, out, something, sting, take

sting for

v.
To charge someone some surprisingly large amount of money: The airline stung us for $100 to change our ticket.
See also: sting

sting

1. tv. to cheat or swindle someone; to overcharge someone. That street merchant stung me, but good.
2. n. a well-planned scheme to entrap criminals. The sting came off without a hitch.
3. tv. to entrap and arrest someone. “We’ve been stung!” they hollered.

sting someone for something

tv. to cheat someone of a particular amount; to make someone pay for something. That guy stung me for twenty bucks!
See also: someone, something, sting
References in periodicals archive ?
So according to the high prevalence of scorpion sting in this area and the lack of a related comprehensive study carried out in the field, it seems that we can achieve solutions to reduce cases of scorpion stings, timely treatment and prevention of mortality and morbidity resulting from this phenomenon using results of the current epidemiological investigation.
The red scorpion sting was seen in 60% cases, and the site of sting was found to be the foot region in 61% cases.
Legs, as the lower parts of the body were targeted by scorpion stings more than the other parts (39%) followed by hands with 36% and head and trunk with 25%.
Further advice is available by downloading the Insect Bites and Stings leaflet at www.
In the current study the data of scorpion stings was stud-ied from the epidemiological aspects included: sex and ages of scorpion sting victims, background of patients, antivenin treatment, month of scorpion sting, scorpion stung part of body, color of scorpi-ons, geographical place (rural/urban).
A BEE sting may have claimed the life of a 90-year-old woman.
In China, for example, there is a big hospital specialized in treating patients with honey and bee stings, and in Japan more attention was paid to this effective treatment method," he said.
Individuals who know they are allergic to wasp or bee stings should carry an epinephrine (adrenalin) autoinjector (Epi-Pen) whenever they may be exposed to these insects.
The team of 10 motorcycle officers set up their hourlong sting at 11 a.
And they only sting to defend their hive [bee shelter]," says Steven Kutcher, an entomologist (en-tuh-MOL-uh-jest), or scientist who studies insects.
In addition to the pain they inflict, insect stings can cause a localized allergic reaction on the skin.
You have a higher chance of being allergic to bee or wasp stings if you are also allergic to foods and pollen.
It is sale and effective for not only bee stings, but also for bleeding, cuts, bruises, bug bites, hemorrhoids, and itchy skin.
Widow Lynn, 45, said construction boss Anthony had suffered small swellings in the past after stings.