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keep a stiff upper lip

To remain stoic during difficult situations. Despite all of the hardships he faced, John always kept a stiff upper lip and didn't let anything bother him. The players were devastated after losing the championship, but their coach encouraged them to keep a stiff upper lip and focus on doing better next year.
See also: keep, lip, stiff, upper
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Keep a stiff upper lip.

Prov. Act as though you are not upset.; Do not let unpleasant things upset you. (English people are stereotypically supposed to be very good at keeping a stiff upper lip.) Even though he was only three years old, Jonathan kept a stiff upper lip the whole time he was in the hospital recovering from his surgery. Jill: Sometimes this job frustrates me so much I could just break down in tears. Jane: Keep a stiff upper lip. Things are bound to improve.
See also: keep, lip, stiff, upper
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

keep a stiff upper lip

Show courage in the face of pain or adversity. For example, I know you're upset about losing the game, but keep a stiff upper lip. This expression presumably alludes to the trembling lips that precede bursting into tears. [Early 1800s]
See also: keep, lip, stiff, upper
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

keep a stiff upper lip

To be courageous or stoic in the face of adversity.
See also: keep, lip, stiff, upper
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

keep a stiff upper lip, to

Do not give way to adversity; appear to be resolute and stoical without showing your true feelings. This term comes from America in the early 1800s and presumably refers to a trembling lip, which betrays that one is about to burst into tears. The expression actually does not make much sense, since it is usually the lower lip that trembles before weeping, but certainly any tremor of the upper lip would be particularly obvious in a man wearing a mustache, in the ubiquitous fashion of the 1830s. “What’s the use of boohooin’? . . . keep a stiff upper lip,” appeared in John Neal’s The Down-Easters (1833), and the expression soon crossed the Atlantic.
See also: keep, stiff, to, upper
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Foreign Policy magazine has recently positioned Ataturk in the first place in a list titled "Stiff Upper Lip" prepared by Charles Homans.
In a way, his stiff upper lip is Jackie Robinson-noble, but the reader can't help but wonder about the conclusion he draws about the nature of American racism.
The brainchild of Superintendent Gary Copson of the East London Force, Copson acknowledges receipt of such a card may be "unpleasant" for the recipient, but urges a stiff upper lip when the crooks complain of shattered feelings and ruined birthday parties.
Perhaps there is an element of wanting to let one's hair down--in England, at least, the rule about keeping a stiff upper lip does not apply to association football.
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A STIFF upper lip in the older generation is stopping some from reporting medical conditions that then end up killing them, a recent report tells us.
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From braving the rain during THAT flotilla, to parachuting through the skies for the Olympics opening ceremony (well, sort of ...), Elizabeth II has shown there's more to being monarch than a having stiff upper lip and owning a massive gaff with a Royal Family-sized balcony.
Ian says: "The stiff upper lip has often been considered our defining national characteristic.
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It may call for more than a stiff upper lip that saw us through the Blitz to survive.
The thriller follows the adventures of hero Richard Hannay, complete with stiff upper lip, British gung-ho and pencil moustache as he encounters dastardly murders, double-crossing secret agents, and, of course, devastatingly beautiful women.