stick up

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stick up

1. verb To stand or protrude upright. I always get this single hair that sticks up after I dry my hair.
2. verb To affix something to a high point on a vertical surface for it to be seen or displayed. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stick" and "up." My mom always sticks my good grades up on the fridge. It's a little embarrassing, but it also makes me feel good. The police are sticking up wanted posters of the criminal.
3. verb To raise and hold something aloft. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stick" and "up." Tom, don't stick your hand up if you don't have something worthwhile to say. The giraffe stuck its head up above the canopy of leaves.
4. verb To rob someone or something, especially at gunpoint. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stick" and "up." The criminal stuck me up in the back alley and stole all my money. He got sent to prison at 16 for sticking up drugstores and supermarkets.
5. noun A robbery, especially at gunpoint. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. That's the second stick-up at that gas station this month. Everybody on the ground, this is a stick-up!
See also: stick, up

stick someone or something up

to rob someone or a business establishment. (Presumably with the aid of a gun.) Max tried to stick the drugstore up. Max stuck up the store.
See also: stick, up

stick something up

 
1. to fasten something to a place where it can be seen; to put something on display, especially by gluing, tacking, or stapling. stick this notice up. Put a copy on every bulletin board. Please stick up this notice.
2. to raise something; to hold something up. she stuck her hand up because she knew the answer. The elephant stuck up its trunk and trumpeted.
See also: stick, up

stick up

to stand upright or on end; to thrust upward. The ugly red flower stuck up from the bouquet. Why is the worst-looking flower sticking up above all the rest?
See also: stick, up

stick up

1. Project from a surface, as in That little cowlick of his sticks up no matter what you do. [Early 1400s]
2. Put up a poster or notice, as in Will you stick up this announcement on the bulletin board? [Late 1700s]
3. Rob, especially at gunpoint, as in The gang concentrated on sticking up liquor stores and gas stations. This usage, dating from the mid-1800s, gave rise to the colloquial phrase, stick 'em up, a robber's order to a victim to raise his or her hands above the head. [1930s]
See also: stick, up

stick up

v.
1. To project or protrude upwards: When I woke up this morning my hair was sticking up.
2. To cause something to project or protrude upwards: The mayor stuck up her hands and waved to the crowd. Stick 'em up—this is a robbery!
3. To rob someone or something, especially at gunpoint: A robber stuck up the bank and stole thousands of dollars. Two people with shotguns walked into the store and stuck it up.
4. To post something with or as if with an adhesive: They stuck up posters all around the neighborhood. I stuck the photos up on my website.
5. stick up for To defend or support someone or something: I stuck up for my little brother whenever the other kids teased him. You should stick up for yourself and not let people spread rumors about you.
See also: stick, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter Five's discussion of "Doing Stickup," for example, is based largely on a "data set" of brief narrative accounts that Franklin Zimring and James Zuehl (1986) reconstructed from police records, and that Katz subsequently reworked.
ATMSafe also pays up to P11,250 to enable the cardholder to replace documents such as government-issued ID cards lost during an ATM stickup.
It was almost midnight at the Jump Start convenience store in Wichita, Kan., when a guy walked in, showed the 23-year-old clerk a gun and announced a stickup. The clerk gave him some money from the register, but then he demanded she open the safe.
Folks, this ain't the kind of training you--or I--need for confronting a prowler in your kitchen or surviving an ATM stickup. If you go everywhere with three or five heavily-armed commando pals, I'm your man.
Alas, what our man hadn't noticed was that someone had scribbled "this is a stickup" on the back of the slip he'd picked up.
In a systematic and thorough manner, the stickup man gently removed spectacles, and taped ankles, wrists, mouths and eyes before minutely inspecting the victims' pockets and wallets.
In Pensacola, Florida, on September 22, a husband and wife were working in their grocery store when a man came in with a stocking mask over his face and said, "This is a stickup." The 60-year-old husband, William Deen, thought it was "some kind of joke" until the robber shoved a gun in his face, reported the News Journal.
John Monahan, 20, shouted "This is a stickup" when he walked into the Ormond Quay Post Office in Dublin.
Well, Purisima did not kidnap or abduct anybody, he didn't stake out the wives of drug lords and other rich and "influential" inmates inside Bilibid to force them to pay for their visits, he didn't hold up a seaman and his wife on Roxas Blvd., he did not lead the gang of 12 in that daring EDSA stickup, he didn't drag anyone out of his house or car for a few moments of contemplation, he hasn't been caught planting shabu on a hapless motorist, he didn't plan the murder of or execute Enzo Pastor, he wasn't seen extorting a Korean or a Chinese.
When an armed stickup man entered a store in Marionville, Mo., he probably mistook 54-year old Jon Alexander for an easy victim.
Minutes later, after the man had done some more business downtown, he said he went to his car on Main Street when the second man approached him from behind and said, "This is a stickup," according to Capt.
My dad said I should stickup for myself, and my mum told me to ignore them because I was better than any of them.
Officers recovered the stickup duds, the guns, 300.000 Euros (about $296,000 US) and positive proof that fear of being shot has about the same effect on men as a swim in very cold water
Elgin police responded to the stickup on the 400 block of Summit Street about 12:45 p.m., according to a news release on the departments Facebook page.
The wannabe stickup man might have had better luck by keeping his finger in the glove.