stick

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stick

1. n. a baseball bat. (Baseball.) He holds the stick up higher than most batters.
2. n. a pool cue. He drew the stick back slowly, sighted again, and gave the cue ball a sharp knock.
3. n. a golf club. These aren’t my sticks, and you aren’t my caddy. What’s going on around here?
4. n. the lever that controls the horizontal and vertical surfaces of the tail of an aircraft. The pilot pulled back on the stick, and the plane did nothing—being that he hadn’t even started the engine or anything. You pull back on the stick, which lowers the tail and raises the nose, and up you go.
5. n. a gearshift lever in a car. (see also stick shift.) I keep reaching for the stick in a car with automatic.
6. n. a drunkard. (Possibly from dipstick, shitstick, or swizzle-stick.) Get that stick out of here before he makes a mess.
7. n. a person’s legs. (Always plural.) He’s got good sticks under him, but he won’t use them.
8. and the sticks n. a rural or backwoods area. (Always with the in this sense and always plural.) You hear a lot about how things are in the sticks. They’re worse.

stick

to/by one's guns
To hold fast to an opinion or a set course of action.
See:
References in classic literature ?
You give 'm me ten stick tobacco," he added after due pause to let the information sink in.
But who shall tell the joy of the next morning, when the church bells were ringing a merry peal, and old Benjy appeared in the servants' hall, resplendent in a long blue coat and brass buttons, and a pair of old yellow buckskins and top-boots which he had cleaned for and inherited from Tom's grandfather, a stout thorn stick in his hand, and a nosegay of pinks and lavender in his buttonhole, and led away Tom in his best clothes, and two new shillings in his breeches-pockets?
He tries them one after another, and very nearly gets at Willum's head by coming in near, and playing over his guard at the half-stick; but somehow Willum blunders through, catching the stick on his shoulders, neck, sides, every now and then, anywhere but on his head, and his returns are heavy and straight, and he is the youngest gamester and a favourite in the parish, and his gallant stand brings down shouts and cheers, and the knowing ones think he'll win if he keeps steady; and Tom, on the groom's shoulder, holds his hands together, and can hardly breathe for excitement.
And he left five years ago--the date is on the stick.
It is my experience that it is only an amiable man in this world who receives testimonials, only an unambitious one who abandons a London career for the country, and only an absent-minded one who leaves his stick and not his visiting-card after waiting an hour in your room.
He staggered backward, dropping his stick, and almost fell off the cliff.
His stick was gone, so he began ripping out chunks of crumbling rock and throwing them in at me.
My directions in the memorandum instructed me to feel along the line traced by the stick, beginning with the end which was nearest to the beacon.
I advanced, in this manner, more than half way along the stick, without encountering anything but the edges of the rocks.
Gryphus flourished his stick above his head, but Van Baerle moved not, and remained standing with his arms akimbo.
I think that's a stick," said Cornelius calmly, "but I don't suppose you will threaten me with that.
She snatched up her stick from the floor, and burst out with a hoarse shout of joy.
Utterson had already quailed at the name of Hyde; but when the stick was laid before him, he could doubt no longer; broken and battered as it was, he recognized it for one that he had himself presented many years before to Henry Jekyll.
He is back there on the highroad with the hardest stick I've met in a good many days.
There were no growls, no fierce screams of rage--the little black stick had taught them to come quietly lest they awaken it.
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