sticky

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Related to stickily: strictly

be in a sticky situation

To be in the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward, embarrassing, precarious, or difficult situation or circumstance. I knew I was in a sticky situation when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the movies. I'll be in quite a sticky situation if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: situation, sticky

in a sticky situation

In the midst of a particularly awkward, embarrassing, precarious, or difficult situation or circumstance. I found myself in a bit of a sticky situation when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the movies. I'll be in quite a sticky situation if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: situation, sticky

a sticky situation

A particularly awkward, embarrassing, precarious, or difficult situation or circumstance. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself in a bit of a sticky situation when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the movies. I'll be in quite a sticky situation if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: situation, sticky

a sticky wicket

A particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. (Generally used with on. Refers to the pitch, i.e., wicket, used in the game of cricket and the difficulty of playing on one after it has been wetted with rain.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself on a bit of a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be batting on a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: sticky, wicket

batting on a sticky wicket

In the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. Refers to the pitch, called a "wicket," used in the game of cricket and the difficulty of playing on one after it has been wetted with rain. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself batting on a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be batting on a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: batting, on, sticky, wicket

on a sticky wicket

In the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. (Refers to the pitch, called a "wicket," used in the game of cricket and the difficulty of playing on one after it has been wetted with rain.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself on a bit of a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be batting on a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: on, sticky, wicket

meet a sticky end

To experience an unpleasant death, usually as a result of one's own actions. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. You will meet a sticky end if you don't change your reckless ways. The serial purse snatcher met a sticky end when he encountered a little old lady trained in karate.
See also: end, meet, sticky

come to a sticky end

To experience an unpleasant death, usually as a result of one's own actions. The serial purse snatcher came to a sticky end when he encountered a little old lady trained in karate. You will come to a sticky end if you don't change your reckless ways.
See also: come, end, sticky

be (batting) on a sticky wicket

To be in the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. I knew I was batting on a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be on quite a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: on, sticky, wicket

have sticky fingers

To have a tendency or inclination to steal things. I think the new cashier we hired has sticky fingers, because money has begun disappearing from the till on the days that he's working.
See also: finger, have, sticky

have sticky fingers

Fig. to have a tendency to steal. The clerk—who had sticky fingers—got fired. The little boy had sticky fingers and was always taking his father's small change.
See also: finger, have, sticky

sticky fingers

A propensity to steal, as in You'd better not leave any cash around; she's known for her sticky fingers. This metaphor makes it seem as if valuables adhere naturally to a thief's fingers. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: finger, sticky

come to a sticky end

BRITISH or

come to a bad end

If someone comes to a sticky end or comes to a bad end, they die in an unpleasant or violent way. Arminius also came to a sticky end, murdered by his own troops. Hassan comes to a bad end, but so does almost everyone else in the book.
See also: come, end, sticky

sticky fingers

INFORMAL
If someone has sticky fingers, they steal things. One of the staff got sticky fingers and lifted hundreds of millions of dollars from accounts at the bank.
See also: finger, sticky

on a sticky wicket

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone is on a sticky wicket, they are in a difficult situation and will find it hard to deal with their problems. It seemed to me that we were on rather a sticky wicket. We couldn't admit that we had got the figures without causing a major row to break out. Note: You can call a difficult situation a sticky wicket. The Tottenham manager confessed it had been `a bit of a sticky wicket' for the past couple of weeks. Note: On a cricket pitch, the wicket is the area of grass between the two sets of stumps. When a lot of rain has fallen on the wicket it becomes soft or `sticky', and in these conditions, it is difficult for the batsmen to predict which way the ball will bounce.
See also: on, sticky, wicket

sticky

1. mod. gooey. (Standard English.) What is this sticky stuff on my shoe? Oh, no!
2. mod. chancy; awkward. Things began to get a little sticky, and Marlowe began to move toward the door.
3. mod. sentimental. Things were getting a little sticky the more Harriet drank. She tried to kiss me, and I left.
4. mod. having to do with hot and humid weather. I can’t take another sticky day like this.

sticky fingers

n. a tendency to steal. Watch these young kids with sticky fingers who come in here “just looking.”
See also: finger, sticky
References in periodicals archive ?
He jumped a bit stickily up the straight, he was a bit messy at the first in the straight and the one in front of the stands.
Exmoor Ranger likes this track, but his jumping is not great and if he jumps as stickily as normal, he will get too far behind.
I've seen him run twice at Cheltenham and each time he has jumped stickily and failed to power up the hill, so why should he suddenly show a liking for the place, and in the Gold Cup of all races?
On heavy going on the same course last time he jumped stickily and was last throughout, but on drying ground this time he jumped boldly and made all, coming home nine lengths clear of El Batal.
Clearly, he won't win if he jumps stickily, but that was the case with Copper Bleu for Hobbs at Cheltenham and he bolted up, jumping well.
You could argue that Middleton Dene was much the better hurdler of the pair, but he'd jumped stickily at times and had not been going well for a long while.
Jumping one or two a bit stickily early on, he gradually got his jumping together and showed his rehabilitation fully with extravagant leaps at the final two fences.
However, Massasoit, who had jumped a little stickily at times, gradually warmed to his task and the 10-11 shot went to the front two out and kept on well for a three-quarter-length victory.
5 on Betfair at the off and, having jumped stickily out the back early on, reached an in-running high of 50.