stern

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Related to sternness: transversely, obstruct

stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. (The "stem" and the "stern" are opposite ends of a ship.) If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. (The "stem" and the "stern" are opposite ends of a ship.) If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

from soup to nuts

Also, from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern . From beginning to end, throughout, as in We went through the whole agenda, from soup to nuts, or She had to learn a whole new system from A to Z, or It rained from start to finish, or We did over the whole house from stem to stern. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and last courses of a meal, appeared in slightly different forms (such as from potage to cheese) from the 1500s on; the precise wording here dates only from the mid-1900s. The second expression alludes to the first and last letters of the Roman alphabet; see also alpha and omega. The third comes from racing and alludes to the entire course of the race; it dates from the mid-1800s. The last variant is nautical, alluding to the front or stem, and rear or stern, of a vessel.
See also: nuts, soup

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

from soup to nuts

from beginning to end; completely. North American informal
Soup is likely to feature as the first course of a formal meal, while a selection of nuts may be offered as the final one.
See also: nuts, soup

from stem to stern

from the front to the back, especially of a ship.
See also: stem, stern

from ˌsoup to ˈnuts

(American English, informal) from beginning to end: She told me the whole story from soup to nuts.
This refers to a long meal that often begins with soup and ends with nuts.
See also: nuts, soup

from ˌstem to ˈstern

all the way from the front of a ship to the back: It was a small boat, less than thirty feet from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stern

n. the posterior; buttocks. The little airplane crashed right into the stern of an enormous lady who didn’t even notice.

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern
References in periodicals archive ?
Normally, she is the epitome of Germanic sternness, a woman wearied by the affairs of state and the wayward behaviour of foreigners who have now turned to her for help.
With sternness, rather than the approval the speaker expects, Christ reminds him that he once had ample opportunity to make the right choice when he chides, "'Tis somewhat late
Applications: Innovative anti-aging formulations that focus on telomere protection, daytime formulations to help the skin boost its natural defense against UV, nighttime formulations to prevent skin age-related changes, In combination with other biofunctionals targeting different antiaging strategies such as Chronogen biofunctional synchronization of internal "clocks" and natural DNA protection, Orsirtine ISR biofunctional: based on sirtuin research, to promote skin longevity; Prolixir S20 biofunctional: successful aging through a sustained proteasome efficacy; Survixyl IS biofunctional: to boost the Sternness Recovery Complex
surpasses both the mildness of Jesus and the lawbound sternness of Moses, thus providing the exemplar of most perfect humanity.
Austerity is taking a grip all over Europe; it means hardship, sternness, severity, but the adjective - austere - has a fuller meaning according to the dictionary which offers 'severely simple' and 'morally strict'.
Her manner was incurably gentle, and she was not aware how much it concealed the sternness of her purpose.
More evidence of the sternness of the stuff that these jumping boys are made of.
And while there are certain changes in his Catholic sermons related to the Catholic beliefs in purgatory and the certainty of penance, there is still the same sternness.
Condemning the attack, Progressive Socialist Party leader MP Walid Jumblatt called on Lebanese political leaders to learn from the incident, which Jumblatt attributed to sternness and lack of compromise within parties, communities and regimes.
Nonetheless, considering Secchi's position, his first article displayed a certain sternness with respect to Kirchhoff, closing with the words: "We wanted, therefore, to say these things less to object to such a distinguished physicist, than to prevent science from taking a retrograde course, especially since history shows that persons of great authority in one branch of knowledge often drag along, under the weight of their opinion, those who are less experienced, even in matters where their studies are not sufficiently deep and where they should not have such influence" [95].
Sternness involves ensuring that leaders are in positions of leadership--as well as not hesitating to remove those who do not enjoy the trust or confidence or do not deserve the trust and confidence of their troopers.
One is tempted to soak up every last drop with a piece of bread, but given Oliver's sternness about healthy eating that's probably not the best idea.
They also called on Prime Minister-designate, Najib Mikati, to form the new government with wisdom and sternness so as to succeed in his mission.
Sun Tzu had it right 2,500 years ago, in his classic The Art of War--"Leadership is a matter of intelligence, trustworthiness, humaneness, courage, and sternness.
Advertisement aimed for young people should not include marketing activities such as presentation of products by personalities and features such as simplicity and sternness.