step up to the plate

(redirected from stepping up to the place)

step up to the plate

To take responsibility for something that needs to be done. A reference to baseball, in which the batter stands next to home plate. Someone will need to step up to the plate and lead this project now that Dylan has resigned. We're all counting on you to step up to the plate and get this done.
See also: plate, step, up

step up to the plate

 
1. Lit. [for a batter in baseball] to move near home plate in preparation for striking the ball when it is pitched. The batter stepped up to the plate and glared at the pitcher.
2. Fig. to move into a position where one is ready to do a task. It's time for Tom to step up to the plate and take on his share of work.
See also: plate, step, up

step up to the plate

mainly AMERICAN
If a person or organization steps up to the plate, they take responsibility for doing something, often something that is difficult. It is time for the council to step up to the plate and provide the necessary leadership. Perhaps Mr. Sutherland should step up to the plate and lead the negotiations. Note: In baseball, the plate is the home base where the batter stands.
See also: plate, step, up

step up to the plate

take action in response to an opportunity, crisis, or challenge; take responsibility for something. chiefly North American
The expression originated in the language of baseball, where ‘the plate’ (in full, the ‘home plate’) is a rubber slab at one corner of the diamond where the batter stands when batting (roughly equivalent to the crease in cricket).
2004 Boston Globe Directors…need to step up to the plate in order for investors to feel comfortable that they are properly represented as shareholders.
See also: plate, step, up

step up to the plate

phr. to voluntarily assume responsibility for something. (From baseball, referring to a batter approaching home plate.) The company stepped up to the plate and paid for the time and effort I spent repairing the unit.
See also: plate, step, up

step up to the plate

Go ahead and act; don’t delay. This phrase comes from baseball, where it tells the batter to step up to home plate and prepare to bat the ball. From the late 1900s on it was frequently transferred to other enterprises, especially business and politics.
See also: plate, step, up