step off


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step off

1. Literally, to take steps down from and off of something. Step off that table before you fall and crack your head open! I recognized her the moment she stepped off of the train.
2. To achieve an approximate measurement of some distance by counting the number of steps it takes to traverse it. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "step" and "off." My foot is almost exactly 12 inches in length, so I can just step off the border of the fence and we'll get a pretty close guess as to how long it needs to be. Step the width of this room off to see if the mattress will even fit in here.
3. slang To stop interfering or involving oneself with someone or something; to get away from someone or something. Used almost exclusively as an imperative. Step off, man, this is none of your business. You'd better step off right now before I knock your lights out.
See also: off, step

step something off

to measure a distance by counting the paces required to cover it. she stepped the distance off and noted it on her pad. Liz stepped off the number of feet from the window to the opposite wall.
See also: off, step

step off (of) something

to leave something elevated with one's first step. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) she stepped off the bottom step and walked down the street. Tony stepped off of the bank and waded across the stream.
See also: off, step

step off

to come off something by taking a step. she came to the bottom step and stepped off. Ed was afraid to dive in from the side of the pool, so he just stepped off.
See also: off, step

step off

v.
1. To take a step so that one is no longer on something: The politician stepped off the plane and waved to the crowd.
2. Slang To leave someone or something alone. Used chiefly as a command: Step off—I saw that clock first, and I'm going to buy it!
See also: off, step
References in periodicals archive ?
This project also provide much nicer around impressive monument Arlene She said: "The area is one of the first sights to greet visitors when they step off the train and we want to make sure they get a good first impression.
Taking that step off the curb always seems safer when the light says it's OK.
I hate to think what visitors think when they step off the coaches.
Frank Lampard has warned Chelsea's championship rivals to forget any idea the history-chasers are about to step off the gas.
Starting in January, visitors will line up to step off the edge of Arizona's Grand Canyon.
Unfortunately uncertainty gripped me and I foolishly tried to step off going about 15mph, which ended up with my head saying hello to the base of the concrete streetlight.
The closing paragraph of a recent Boston Globe editorial declared, "Now it's time for [Harvard University President Lawrence[ Summers to step off of his tongue and modernize the debate."
Of course, if those evangelicals would ever get helpful and step off into the rapture--and if they would just hand us the keys to their places during liftoff--our housing shortages could be over.
Just once I'd like to see a manufacturer step off this merry-go-round and present its product clearly, concisely, and with a minimum of hyperbole.
With a "Lucy" call, our left wideout will step off the line and our right slot back will step onto the LOS.
'Had the additional evidence presented demonstrated a motive for Sean Fox to step off the horse, the legal advice may well have been different.'
Martin Luther King reminded us that 'the arc of change is long but it tends toward justice.' We will step off soon on this historic march to help guarantee that justice, once achieved, will never be rolled back.
When a visitor steps on the pedal, a deafening slice of a musician covering Jimi Hendrix's ravishing, enraged Star Spangled Banner pours from the amp; step off the pedal and the anthem ceases.
"We are going to get our legs underneath us and approach it kind of conservatively and make sure we've got the ferrous solved first before we step off commercially marketing the nonferrous," he says.