step into someone's shoes

step into (someone's) shoes

To fill someone's position, especially one of power or authority. I don't know who they're getting to step into Davidson's shoes, but I doubt they'll be anywhere near as good a manager as he was. I tell you, I wouldn't want to step into her shoes. Sure, the pay would be better, but I don't want all that stress!
See also: shoe, step

step into someone's shoes

Take someone's place, as in He's groomed Harriet to step into his shoes when he resigns. Also see fill someone's shoes; in someone's shoes.
See also: shoe, step

step into someone's shoes

COMMON If you step into someone's shoes, you start doing their job instead of them. In America, if a president resigns or dies in office, the vice-president steps into his shoes. Now that Chris is gone she wants me to step into his shoes. Note: You can also say that you fill someone else's shoes if you do their job or hold their position as well as they did. It'll take a good man to fill her shoes.
See also: shoe, step
References in periodicals archive ?
I have to step into someone's shoes as much as possible.
When I was invited to step into someone's shoes at Santa Pod I enjoyed it so much I've carried on.