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stem the tide

To stop something from continuing or worsening. Once the people turn on you, you'll have a hard time stemming the tide of rebellion.
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. The stem and the stern are opposite ends of a ship. If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. The stem is the front part of a ship and the stern is the rear. If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

stem from (something)

To come, result, or develop from something else. My fear of the water stems from the time my brother nearly drowned me when we were playing in our cousin's pool as kids. The poverty in this area stems from the closure of the coal mine, the largest single employer in the entire county.
See also: stem

from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem from something

[for an event] to result from something. These problems all stem from your mismanagement. Our difficulties stem from the bad weather we have been having.
See also: stem

from soup to nuts

Also, from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern . From beginning to end, throughout, as in We went through the whole agenda, from soup to nuts, or She had to learn a whole new system from A to Z, or It rained from start to finish, or We did over the whole house from stem to stern. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and last courses of a meal, appeared in slightly different forms (such as from potage to cheese) from the 1500s on; the precise wording here dates only from the mid-1900s. The second expression alludes to the first and last letters of the Roman alphabet; see also alpha and omega. The third comes from racing and alludes to the entire course of the race; it dates from the mid-1800s. The last variant is nautical, alluding to the front or stem, and rear or stern, of a vessel.
See also: nuts, soup

stem the tide

Stop the course of a trend or tendency, as in It is not easy to stem the tide of public opinion. This idiom uses stem in the sense of "stop" or "restrain." [Mid-1800s]
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

stem the tide

or

stem the flow

COMMON If you stem the tide or stem the flow of something bad which is happening to a large degree, you start to control and stop it. The authorities seem powerless to stem the rising tide of violence. The cut in interest rates has done nothing to stem the flow of job losses.
See also: stem, tide

from soup to nuts

from beginning to end; completely. North American informal
Soup is likely to feature as the first course of a formal meal, while a selection of nuts may be offered as the final one.
See also: nuts, soup

from stem to stern

from the front to the back, especially of a ship.
See also: stem, stern

from ˌsoup to ˈnuts

(American English, informal) from beginning to end: She told me the whole story from soup to nuts.
This refers to a long meal that often begins with soup and ends with nuts.
See also: nuts, soup

from ˌstem to ˈstern

all the way from the front of a ship to the back: It was a small boat, less than thirty feet from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

ˌstem the ˈtide (of something)

stop the large increase of something bad: The police are unable to stem the rising tide of crime.
See also: stem, tide

stem from

v.
To have something as an origin or cause; have developed from something: Most prejudice stems from fear.
See also: stem

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern

from soup to nuts

From the beginning to the end; the whole thing. The analogy to a complete meal of numerous courses dates back many years. John Heywood’s proverb collection of 1546 has it “from potage to cheese,” and John Clarke’s 1639 collection, “from th’egges to th’apples.” The precise locution of soup to nuts appears to be American and dates only from the early twentieth century. A very similar cliché, from start to finish, comes from sports, particularly rowing races. The earliest example in print, according to the OED, dates from a sports publication of 1868. This cliché is more common in Britain, where finish is used as a noun more often than it is in America. See also alpha and omega; from the word go.
See also: nuts, soup

stem the tide, to

To stop the course of a trend, opinion, or the like. The verb to stem, meaning to stop or restrain, comes from the Old Norse word stemma, meaning “to dam.” It would take an enormous dam to stop ocean tides, but the tide of public opinion, for example, can be checked or diverted. Thus Fred A. Paley wrote (The Tragedies of Aeschylus, 1855), “Aristophanes evidently saw the tide . . . and he vainly tried to stem it by the barrier of his ridicule.”
See also: stem

stem to stern, from

From beginning to end; entirely. In nautical terminology the stem is an upright at the bow (front) of a vessel and the stern is the back end. This counterpart of from head to toe and from soup to nuts was quoted by the Roman writer Cicero as a Greek proverb. In English the term was used literally from about 1600 on, and figuratively soon afterward.
See also: stem
References in periodicals archive ?
For those of us using an off-the-shelf generic rubber stem, be sure you get the correct size stem for the hole in your wheel.
Thankfully, there are tools for pulling a tractor tire valve stem into a wheel.
Stem cells are found in the early embryo (conception to nine weeks), the foetus, the amniotic fluid and umbilical cord, as well as in mature tissues and organs throughout the adult body.
Stem cells occurring in the various tissues in the adult or child at differing stages of growth and development, herald different levels of potential, which continues to be a central theme of enquiry within the stem cell community.
* Iteration and reflection are an important part of the STEM learning process.
* STEM education transcends the classroom walls, integrating into the community.
The molecule was developed using stem cell tissue culture technology.
The company said the technology will have a greater impact for patients that would require stem cell transplants; it works with the existing stem cell population in the individual's system.
Much of the emphasis and 1-1O-Pe for motivating -individuals toward STEM has been focused on K-12 and postsecondary formal and informal educators, including out-of-school programs to increase STEM participation.
"Half of all STEM jobs are available to workers without a four-year college degree, and these jobs pay $53,000 on average--a wage 10 percent higher than jobs with similar educational requirements.
In FY2010 the Navy invested $54 million in direct involvement, as well as an additional $20 million to help fund more than 180 STEM programs.
"For the longest time, people always thought there was one single type of blood stem cell in the bone marrow that continually replenished the blood sys tern throughout the life of a person," says study coauthor Grant Challen of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.
Therefore, the most attractive strategy is to replace disabled cells, and to this end, to take advantage of stem cells.
Stem cells are primal cells common to all multicellular organisms that retain the ability to renew themselves through cell division and can be differentiated into a wide range of specialized cell types.