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stem the tide

To stop something from continuing or worsening. Once the people turn on you, you'll have a hard time stemming the tide of rebellion.
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. The stem and the stern are opposite ends of a ship. If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. The stem is the front part of a ship and the stern is the rear. If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

stem from (something)

To come, result, or develop from something else. My fear of the water stems from the time my brother nearly drowned me when we were playing in our cousin's pool as kids. The poverty in this area stems from the closure of the coal mine, the largest single employer in the entire county.
See also: stem

from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem from something

[for an event] to result from something. These problems all stem from your mismanagement. Our difficulties stem from the bad weather we have been having.
See also: stem

from soup to nuts

Also, from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern . From beginning to end, throughout, as in We went through the whole agenda, from soup to nuts, or She had to learn a whole new system from A to Z, or It rained from start to finish, or We did over the whole house from stem to stern. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and last courses of a meal, appeared in slightly different forms (such as from potage to cheese) from the 1500s on; the precise wording here dates only from the mid-1900s. The second expression alludes to the first and last letters of the Roman alphabet; see also alpha and omega. The third comes from racing and alludes to the entire course of the race; it dates from the mid-1800s. The last variant is nautical, alluding to the front or stem, and rear or stern, of a vessel.
See also: nuts, soup

stem the tide

Stop the course of a trend or tendency, as in It is not easy to stem the tide of public opinion. This idiom uses stem in the sense of "stop" or "restrain." [Mid-1800s]
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

stem the tide

or

stem the flow

COMMON If you stem the tide or stem the flow of something bad which is happening to a large degree, you start to control and stop it. The authorities seem powerless to stem the rising tide of violence. The cut in interest rates has done nothing to stem the flow of job losses.
See also: stem, tide

from soup to nuts

from beginning to end; completely. North American informal
Soup is likely to feature as the first course of a formal meal, while a selection of nuts may be offered as the final one.
See also: nuts, soup

from stem to stern

from the front to the back, especially of a ship.
See also: stem, stern

from ˌsoup to ˈnuts

(American English, informal) from beginning to end: She told me the whole story from soup to nuts.
This refers to a long meal that often begins with soup and ends with nuts.
See also: nuts, soup

from ˌstem to ˈstern

all the way from the front of a ship to the back: It was a small boat, less than thirty feet from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

ˌstem the ˈtide (of something)

stop the large increase of something bad: The police are unable to stem the rising tide of crime.
See also: stem, tide

stem from

v.
To have something as an origin or cause; have developed from something: Most prejudice stems from fear.
See also: stem

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern
References in periodicals archive ?
Long, thin stems look good in containers with small delicate necks, but they'll lean gracefully in a cube-shaped vase or a round one with a narrow pinched-in middle.
Although the researchers are confident that the transplanted neural stem cells produced new red blood cells, they haven't proved that point.
is life sciences driven company that is developing and commercializing stem cell expansion technology products for the potential treatment of a variety of disorders.
Congratulations to the COBLT researchers on this landmark study which brings valuable information to the transplant community, cord blood banking community and patients and families who rely on stem cells for a life-saving transplant, " says Judy Angelbeck, PhD, Senior Vice President, Pall Medical.
Finally, a putative brain tumor stem cell has also been isolated.
By designing new scaffolds that can interact with stem cells, researchers are working to mimic the way tissues and organs naturally develop in the body.
But embryonic stem cells don't remain in the body forever.
Currently, biotechnologists investigating stem cells use embryos donated by couples who have had infertility treatments.
Under the terms of the stock swap, Stem Cell will exchange 27 million shares of Stem Cell's common stock for 66 million shares of Pluristem common stock and five-year warrants to purchase 66 million shares of Pluristem common stock at an exercise price of $.
Projects supported by the National Center for Research Resources under this PA are intended to generate research tools, reagents, or stem cells of utility to research on a broad range of tissue or cell types and of interest to more than one categorical or disease-oriented NIH institute or center.
Some projects will focus on mechanisms of encouraging embryonic stem cells to mature into adult cell types that can be used in therapies, while others will look for ways of effectively delivering these cells to damaged tissues.
Stem cell research offers enormous potential for treating many congenital, developmental, psychiatric, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system for which there are no treatments or cures.
Stem Cell Innovations proprietary, human pluripotent stem cells, known as PluriCells[TM], have the potential to aid in drug discovery, toxicology, and cell therapy.
Stem cell research offers enormous potential for treating many congenital, developmental, psychiatric or degenerative diseases of the nervous system for which there are no treatments or cures.