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stem the tide

To stop something from continuing or worsening. Once the people turn on you, you'll have a hard time stemming the tide of rebellion.
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. (The "stem" and the "stern" are opposite ends of a ship.) If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. (The "stem" and the "stern" are opposite ends of a ship.) If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem from something

[for an event] to result from something. These problems all stem from your mismanagement. Our difficulties stem from the bad weather we have been having.
See also: stem

from soup to nuts

Also, from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern . From beginning to end, throughout, as in We went through the whole agenda, from soup to nuts, or She had to learn a whole new system from A to Z, or It rained from start to finish, or We did over the whole house from stem to stern. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and last courses of a meal, appeared in slightly different forms (such as from potage to cheese) from the 1500s on; the precise wording here dates only from the mid-1900s. The second expression alludes to the first and last letters of the Roman alphabet; see also alpha and omega. The third comes from racing and alludes to the entire course of the race; it dates from the mid-1800s. The last variant is nautical, alluding to the front or stem, and rear or stern, of a vessel.
See also: nuts, soup

stem the tide

Stop the course of a trend or tendency, as in It is not easy to stem the tide of public opinion. This idiom uses stem in the sense of "stop" or "restrain." [Mid-1800s]
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

stem the tide

or

stem the flow

COMMON If you stem the tide or stem the flow of something bad which is happening to a large degree, you start to control and stop it. The authorities seem powerless to stem the rising tide of violence. The cut in interest rates has done nothing to stem the flow of job losses.
See also: stem, tide

from soup to nuts

from beginning to end; completely. North American informal
Soup is likely to feature as the first course of a formal meal, while a selection of nuts may be offered as the final one.
See also: nuts, soup

from stem to stern

from the front to the back, especially of a ship.
See also: stem, stern

from ˌsoup to ˈnuts

(American English, informal) from beginning to end: She told me the whole story from soup to nuts.
This refers to a long meal that often begins with soup and ends with nuts.
See also: nuts, soup

from ˌstem to ˈstern

all the way from the front of a ship to the back: It was a small boat, less than thirty feet from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

ˌstem the ˈtide (of something)

stop the large increase of something bad: The police are unable to stem the rising tide of crime.
See also: stem, tide

stem from

v.
To have something as an origin or cause; have developed from something: Most prejudice stems from fear.
See also: stem

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern