stem to stern, from

from stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. The stem is the front part of a ship and the stern is the rear. If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. The stem and the stern are opposite ends of a ship. If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

from the front to the back, especially of a ship.
See also: stem, stern

from ˌstem to ˈstern

all the way from the front of a ship to the back: It was a small boat, less than thirty feet from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern

stem to stern, from

From beginning to end; entirely. In nautical terminology the stem is an upright at the bow (front) of a vessel and the stern is the back end. This counterpart of from head to toe and from soup to nuts was quoted by the Roman writer Cicero as a Greek proverb. In English the term was used literally from about 1600 on, and figuratively soon afterward.
See also: stem