steer away from (someone or something)

(redirected from steers us away from)

steer away from (someone or something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle in a direction away from someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "away" to specify what is being driven. I steered away from the truck that was stopped in the middle of the road. She managed to steer the car away from the crowd of people at the last moment.
2. To avoid interacting with someone. Steer away from the boss today—he's yelling at everyone he sees. I always try to steer away from toxic or negative people in my life.
3. To avoid pursuing, utilizing, or committing to something. I suggest you steer away from the trains today—there's a strike on, so none of them are on time. I think we would do well to steer away from such drastic measures.
4. To attempt to convince or persuade someone to avoid someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "away." I try to steer people away from that brand, to be honest. They may be less expensive, but those computers are notorious for breaking down. She keeps trying to steer me away from her brother, but he and I are just naturally drawn to each other.
See also: away, steer

steer away from someone or something

to move or turn away from someone or something. You had better steer away from Jeff. He is in a terrible mood. Try to steer away from the potholes. The road is full of them.
See also: away, steer
References in periodicals archive ?
That belief sometimes steers us away from stories that might be helpful to readers.
The only explanation for the "localization" of this word is, perhaps, we believe anything improbable steers us away from the real thing.
This steers us away from the urgency of closing a deal and guides us toward helping clients discover solutions they find on their own with our advice.
Dianne steers us away from the nearest herd so we don't rile the stallion--he's got a six-mare harem to protect.
The limited selection of foods alone steers us away from recommending a raw diet as your full-time way of eating.
Continuing to place blame on technology or even algorithms for causing dependent behavior steers us away from looking at a much deeper and more difficult issue.
If it steers us away from the dangers and better positions us to pursue the opportunities -- and to not waste our resources on dangerous or counterproductive exploitation.