steer

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a bum steer

Poor, inaccurate, or misleading information or advice. My advisor really gave me a bum steer when she pushed me to take this class that I'm currently failing. I did my own research to confirm that my doctor wasn't giving me a bum steer when she suggested this procedure.
See also: bum, steer

steer clear

To avoid (someone or something). Steer clear of the boss today—he's yelling at everyone he sees. The 8:00 train is always late, so steer clear if you want to be on time.
See also: clear, steer

steer clear of (someone or something)

To avoid someone or something. Steer clear of the boss today—he's yelling at everyone he sees. The 8:00 train is always late, so steer clear of it if you want to be on time.
See also: clear, of, steer

follow a middle course

To take a moderate approach, as opposed to using extreme measures. Sir, I think you need to avoid making any inflammatory statements on this issue and follow a middle course instead.
See also: course, follow, middle

steer a middle course

To take a moderate approach, as opposed to using extreme measures. Sir, I think you need to avoid making any inflammatory statements on this issue and steer a middle course instead.
See also: course, middle, steer

take a middle course

To take a moderate approach, as opposed to using extreme measures. Sir, I think you need to avoid making any inflammatory statements on this issue and take a middle course instead.
See also: course, middle, take

steer away from (someone or something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle in a direction away from someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "away" to specify what is being driven. I steered away from the truck that was stopped in the middle of the road. She managed to steer the car away from the crowd of people at the last moment.
2. To avoid interacting with someone. Steer away from the boss today—he's yelling at everyone he sees. I always try to steer away from toxic or negative people in my life.
3. To avoid pursuing, utilizing, or committing to something. I suggest you steer away from the trains today—there's a strike on, so none of them are on time. I think we would do well to steer away from such drastic measures.
4. To attempt to convince or persuade someone to avoid someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "away." I try to steer people away from that brand, to be honest. They may be less expensive, but those computers are notorious for breaking down. She keeps trying to steer me away from her brother, but he and I are just naturally drawn to each other.
See also: away, steer

steer for (something)

To guide or aim a vehicle in the direction of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "for" to specify what is being driven. I steered for the embankment to avoid the truck that was barreling toward us. She steered her boat for the mouth of the river.
See also: steer

steer into (something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle into something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "into" to specify what is being driven. I swerved to avoid the truck that was barreling toward us and steered right into the side of a building. She steered her boat into the harbor. The maniac steered his van right into a crowd of people.
2. To guide, direct, or lead someone into some situation. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "into." The star quarterback helped steer the team into the playoffs for the first time in nearly 40 years. That dodgy financial advisor steered us into all sorts of bad investments.
See also: steer

steer through (something)

1. To manage to drive (a vehicle) through some difficult, dangerous, or adverse impediment or weather condition. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "through" to specify what is being driven. I didn't feel confident enough to steer the car through all the snow and ice on the ground, so I let Mary drive instead. It was difficult steering through such turbulent weather, but I knew we had to get back to shore as soon as we could. How could you even steer through such thick fog?
2. To navigate or maneuver (a vehicle) through some passage or obstacle. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "through" to specify what is being driven. I don't know how we'll be able to steer through this crowd of people. We had to steer the boat through the series of buoys the police has set in the harbor. My mother always finds it so stressful having to steer her car through these narrows streets of this town whenever she comes to visit me.
3. To guide or direct someone through some passage or obstacle. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "through." I'd feel better if Mark were there to help steer you through those treacherous mountain roads. The captain of the ship steered us through the narrow river so we could see some more of the indigenous jungle wildlife.
4. To guide or direct someone through some difficult, confusing, or convoluted situation or process. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "through." We hired a lawyer to steer us through the application for our permits. Our advisors will help steer you through the various options at your disposal for your retirement fund.
See also: steer, through

steer toward (something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle in the direction of someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "toward" to specify what is being driven. Keep the boat steady and toward the lighthouse. The police officer told me to steer the car toward a checkpoint on the side of the road. The pilot began steering the plane toward the nearest airport.
2. To attempt to convince or persuade someone to choose, consider, or become involved with someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "toward." Mary said she wanted to go out with Mark, but I tried to steer her toward Mike instead. These pushy salespeople always try to steer you toward the more expensive options. I always try to steer my clients toward sensible investments that will yield steady, long-term growth.
See also: steer, toward

*bum steer

misleading instructions or guidance; a misleading suggestion. (Bum = false; phony. Steer = guidance, as in the steering of a car. *Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) Wilbur gave Ted a bum steer and Ted ended up in the wrong town. I got a bum steer from the salesman, and I paid far more than I needed to for a used car.
See also: bum, steer

kick like a mule

 and kick like a steer
to kick very hard. They say that ostriches will kick like a mule if you bother them. Stay away from the back end of Tom's horse. It will kick like a steer when a stranger comes up.
See also: kick, like, mule

steer away from someone or something

to move or turn away from someone or something. You had better steer away from Jeff. He is in a terrible mood. Try to steer away from the potholes. The road is full of them.
See also: away, steer

steer clear (of someone or something)

to avoid someone or something. John is mad at me, so I've been steering clear of him. Steer clear of that book. It has many errors in it.
See also: clear, steer

steer into something

to turn or drive into something. Try to steer into the right parking space this time. Poor Wally steered into the curb.
See also: steer

steer someone or something through something

to guide someone or something through something that is confusing or treacherous. I tried to steer Judy through the registration procedure, but I really didn't know what I was doing. should I try to steer my car through all this foot traffic or take a different route?
See also: steer, through

steer something for something

to aim oneself or one's vehicle toward something. Jeff steered the car for the entrance to the tunnel and stepped on the gas. The driver steered the bus for the center lane just in time.
See also: steer

steer something toward someone or something

to guide something in the direction of someone or something. The farmer steered the tractor toward the sheriff, who had come to talk to the farmer. Please steer the car toward the right side.
See also: steer, toward

steer through something

to maneuver through something that is confusing or treacherous. Do you think you can steer through this flooded tunnel? I can't steer through this mess of leaves and mud on the road.
See also: steer, through

steer toward someone or something

to turn or drive toward someone or something. He steered toward the empty parking space, but someone got there before he did. steer toward the house with the red door.
See also: steer, toward

bum steer

False or misleading information; poor advice. For example, Gene felt his doctor had given him a bum steer, as he hadn't lost any weight on the diet . [Slang; c. 1920]
See also: bum, steer

steer clear of

Stay away from, avoid, as in Dad warned us to steer clear of Dr. Smith and his poor advice. This idiom alludes to guiding a vessel away from some obstacle. Its figurative use was first recorded in 1723.
See also: clear, of, steer

a bum steer

mainly AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you describe information that you are given as a bum steer, you mean that it is incorrect. Did you give me a bum steer about your name and address? Note: This expression may refer to a worthless bullock, which is a young male cow. Alternatively, it may refer to someone being given directions which are not correct.
See also: bum, steer

steer clear of someone/something

COMMON If you steer clear of someone or something, you deliberately avoid them. I'd advise anyone with sensitive or dry skins to steer clear of soap. Steer clear of Paola unless you want to be stuck with her all evening.

bum steer

a piece of false information or guidance. informal, chiefly North American
In this context, bum means ‘bad, worthless’, and steer ‘advice’ or ‘guidance’ (it has no connection with young bulls).
See also: bum, steer

steer (or take) a middle course

adopt a policy which avoids extremes.
See also: course, middle, steer

steer clear of

take care to avoid or keep away from.
2002 ChartAttack Live Reviews If you're looking for Hollywood gloss and spectacle, steer clear of this film.
See also: clear, of, steer

a bum ˈsteer

(American English, informal) wrong or unhelpful information or advice: Whoever recommended this software gave you a bum steer, I’m afraid.
See also: bum, steer

steer/stay/keep clear (of somebody/something)

avoid somebody/something: I’m trying to lose weight so I have to steer clear of fattening foods.It’s best to stay clear of the bank at lunchtimes as it gets very busy.
See also: clear, keep, stay, steer

follow/steer/take a middle ˈcourse

,

find, etc. a/the middle ˈway

follow, find, etc. a plan that is halfway between two opposing plans; compromise: Kate wanted to stay for the rest of the week, and I wanted to leave straight away, so in the end we followed a middle course and stayed a couple of days.In politics you often have to steer a middle course. OPPOSITE: go to extremes
See also: course, follow, middle, steer, take

bum steer

(ˈbəm ˈstir)
n. a false lead; false information. You sure gave me a bum steer when you told me who he was.
See also: bum, steer

steer clear of

To stay away from; avoid.
See also: clear, of, steer

bum steer

Bad advice. This slangy term uses bum in the sense of incorrect or erroneous, a usage dating from the 1890s or earlier. Former New York governor Mario Cuomo in his 1968 book, Thieves, wrote, “I guess I gave you a bum steer on him.”
See also: bum, steer

steer clear of, to

To avoid. This term comes from its literal use in sailing in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries (Daniel Defoe used it in Colonel Jacque, 1723) and was being used figuratively by the late eighteenth century. George Washington said, in his farewell address (1796), “It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliance with any portion of the foreign world.”
See also: clear, steer

bum steer

Misleading advice. This phrase has nothing to do with a tough piece of steak. “Bum” signifies “wrong” and “steer” means “direction” in the sense of steering a vehicle. So if someone has given you a bum steer, you have in a sense grounds for a beef.
See also: bum, steer
References in periodicals archive ?
This means that more experienced drivers steered more accurately on straight-road segments.
The conventional wisdom is that cars are steered primarily by control of the steering wheel angle; that is, by position control as opposed to force control.