steep

(redirected from steepness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

a little (bit) steep

A bit more expensive than desired or expected. Thirty bucks for two movie tickets and an order of popcorn? That's a little steep, don't you think? They said the repairs would come to about $500, which seemed a little bit steep, if you ask me.
See also: little, steep

be a bit steep

1. To be more expensive than was expected or is reasonable. Thirty bucks for two movie tickets and popcorn? That's a bit steep, don't you think?
2. To be unfair, untrue, or unreasonable. I just think it's a bit steep for her to call me lazy, when she knows I've got a medical condition keeping me from working.
See also: bit, steep

be rather steep

1. To be more expensive than was expected or is reasonable. Thirty bucks for two movie tickets and popcorn? That's rather steep, don't you think?
2. To be unfair, untrue, or unreasonable. I just think it's rather steep for her to call me lazy, when she knows I've got a medical condition keeping me from working!
See also: rather, steep

be steeped in (something)

To possess or display a certain characteristic or quality to a great degree. Every activity at this school is steeped in tradition.
See also: steep

it's/that's a bit steep

1. That's a bit more expensive than expected. Thirty bucks for two movie tickets and popcorn? That's a bit steep, don't you think?
2. That's rather unfair, untrue, or unreasonable. I just think it's a bit steep for her to call me lazy, when she knows I've got a medical condition keeping me from working!
See also: bit, steep

steep in

1. Literally, to soak something in some substance in order to imbue something into or draw something out of it. A noun or pronoun is used between "steep" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. You can steep tea leaves in cold water and still extract the same flavor, but it works much quicker with hot water. The cloth is steeped in a special mixture of chemicals that give is a softness similar to silk.
2. To expose someone or something to or immerse them or it in a particular experience or situation in order to be saturated or imbued with some property. A noun or pronoun is used between "steep" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. My parents made an especial effort to steep my sibling and me in a wide range of cultural and educational influences from a very young age. As the leading university of our country for over 300 years, this school is steeped in history and tradition.
See also: steep
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

little steep

 and little pricey
Fig. relatively expensive; costing more than one wants to pay. The food here is a little pricey, but you get a lot of it.
See also: little, steep

steep someone in something

Fig. to immerse someone in some kind of knowledge or other experience; to saturate someone with some kind of experience or training. (Fig. on steep something in something.) Her parents steeped her in good literature and music. she steeped herself in the legends of her people.
See also: steep

steep something in something

to soak something in a liquid. I steeped the shirt in red dye. You have to steep these herbs in steamy hot water for five minutes.
See also: steep
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

be a bit/rather ˈsteep

(informal) (of a price or a request) be too much; be unreasonable: €6? That seems a bit steep for a small piece of cheese.It’s a bit steep to expect us to work longer hours for no extra money.
See also: bit, rather, steep

be ˈsteeped in something

(written) have a lot of a particular quality: This is a city steeped in history.
See also: something, steep
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

steep in

v.
To expose someone or something to something else in order to imbue some quality: The teacher steeped the students in classic literature. The university is steeped in tradition.
See also: steep
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

steep

mod. [of a price] high; expensive. Their prices are pretty steep, but their goods are of high quality.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The breaking length [X.sub.br] (the distance the wave propagates before breaking) depends on the initial wave steepness [s.sub.0] and variations of the bottom profile along the wave path.
From NPDZ side stream# 7 is more deformed as the upper segment has more steepness index value as compared to the steepness index value from stream# 58 of SPPZ i.e., (ksn = 76.4 and ksn = 121.14) respectively (see Figures 8a and 8b).
The distribution of 54 children with pectus excavatum deformity by the criteria of deformation of the sternocostal complex (test of auto-correction, CE, BBT, angle of the steepness of the deformed ribs) and degrees of elasticity of the chest were presented in Table 1.
When Carter's equation to calculate the maximum steepness of adhesive characteristics ([r.sub.1x]--wheel radius; Q--vertical force):
It usually stems from a misguided attempt to fix the steepness in your swing by making more of an inside move away from the ball.
THE STEEPNESS in the decline of British commercial fishing catches from 1995 until 2005 has been highlighted in a new report from European Union (EU) statistical agency Eurostat.
Because of the steepness of the increase, said New Era, "The Bank of Namibia [the county's central bank] is likely to respond to rising inflation by raising the interest rate by 0.5% in the first quarter [2007]."
The real value-added role for finance is in helping the organization extend the life of a flagging business, to lessen the steepness of a decline or to seek new opportunities that can fill a void.
The patented use of a heating ramp allows a high resolution despite the short pulses when the steepness of the ramp and temperature threshold are adjusted properly.
settlement in Seattle, but the steepness of its slopes made Queen Anne one of the city's last neighborhoods to be completely developed.
The slopes where avalanches are most likely to occur are between 35 and 45 degrees in steepness. Snow slides down steeper slopes before it can settle into place.
Then, near the bottom of the hill, the steepness decreases and the land becomes relatively flat or forms a depression, where topsoil accumulates."
And here, paradoxically, there are also challenging physical conditions in the steepness of the site and the narrowness of the terraces, that prompt the architects to draw on and refine the experience of working in Tokyo.
The viral load drop at the end of that period would be the main endpoint of interest, and the rapidity of the viral load reduction (or the steepness of the slope) could be a secondary indicator of the drug's activity.
Given the steepness of the trail and the fact that you're riding across the slope rather than down, you expect the bike to slip out from under you.