steady

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Related to steadiness: shake off, downside, get on

steady hand on the tiller

Full control over a situation. I felt comfortable knowing that even during this difficult time, he had a steady hand on the tiller.
See also: hand, on, steady, tiller

steady the ship

1. To steer a ship so that it sails smoothly. I'm really glad they've steadied the ship—those waves were making me so nauseous!
2. By extension, to restore calm and order to a situation. I just recently got divorced, so I hope my mother moving in and helping with the kids will steady the ship. We just hired a new supervisor to steady the ship after this merger.
See also: ship, steady

steady as she goes

Describing someone or something that is progressing in a stable manner. This nautical phrase was originally used in reference to a ship that was sailing steadily. (Ships were traditionally referred to as female.) A: "How's your new business coming along?" B: "Steady as she goes! We expect to break even the first year and then start making a profit." In the midst of all this social upheaval, I hope our government can stay steady-as-she-goes.
See also: goes, she, steady

slow but sure

Slow or incremental but yielding steady, dependable progress. It's going to be slow but sure writing my thesis, as I have to balance my part-time job with my research. A: "Hey, how's the new novel coming along?" B: "It's been slow but sure."
See also: but, slow, sure

at a clip

1. In a particular interval or span of time. I don't feel like going out tonight because I've had to sit in lectures for five hours at a clip every day this week.
2. At a particular pace. In this usage, an adjective describing the pace is used between "a" and "clip." Since you're still a beginner, just see if you can get your horse to move at a steady clip.
See also: clip

ready, steady, go

An instruction to begin something, typically some kind of competition. The phrase is commonly used at the beginning of a race to indicate when the competitors can start. Primarily heard in UK. Is everyone in their positions? OK then, ready, steady, go!
See also: go

steady on

Be more careful; don't be so reckless. Steady on, kids—don't break anything in here. Steady on, there's no need to fight! Let's all just take a minute and calm down.
See also: on, steady

go steady (with someone)

To date someone exclusively. Don't ask Jill out—she's already going steady with Bobby. Are those two really going steady?
See also: go, steady

(as) steady as a rock

1. Firmly fixed in position; unmovable. There's no way this table would break underneath me—it's made from solid oak, so it's as steady as a rock! The bouncer of the club stood in the door, steady as a rock, turning away anyone without proper ID.
2. Completely and thoroughly resolute, dependable, and trustworthy. I have to say, Sarah has been as steady as a rock during this whole ordeal. Whoever is chosen to lead the company will need to be steady as a rock.
See also: rock, steady

slow and steady wins the race

Persistent, consistent, and diligent progress, even if it is somewhat slow, will produce better results than rushing to get somewhere or achieve something, as the latter can result in mistakes or may prove unsustainable or unreliable. Derived from the classic Aesop fable of "The Tortoise and the Hare," in which the titular tortoise is able to beat the hare in a race because the hare, overconfident in his superior speed, decides to take a nap along the way. Look, I know you're eager to get all this data entered so you can move on to the next stage of the project, but slow and steady wins the race, OK? We'll be much worse off if the data has errors in it than if it takes a little longer to get done. A: "Tom has been finishing about 10 articles a week—why are you so far behind him?" B: "Because his articles are all poorly written and researched. I've always believed that slow and steady wins the race, and I think my work shows it."
See also: and, race, slow, steady, win

go with someone

 and go steady with someone
to have a romantic relationship with someone. (Go steady is dated.) Sally has been going with Mark for two months now. He wants to go steady with her. He doesn't want her to see other guys.
See also: go

go with (someone or something)

to depart in the company of someone or a group. Jim's not here. He went with the last busload. I'm leaving now. Do you want to go with?
See also: go

go with something

 
1. Lit. to accompany something agreeably. Milk doesn't go with grapefruit. Pink doesn't go with orange.
2. Fig. to choose something (over something else). I think I'll go with the yellow one. We decided to go with the oak table rather than the walnut one.
See also: go

slow and steady wins the race

Prov. If you work slowly but constantly, you will succeed better than if you work fast for a short while and do not continue. (Associated with Aesop's fable of "The Tortoise and the Hare.") Joy only had a little bit of time to spend sewing every day, but she worked steadily and soon had finished a beautiful quilt. Slow and steady wins the race.
See also: and, race, slow, steady, win

slow but sure

 and slowly but surely
slow but unstoppable. Bob's progress on his novel was slow but sure. Nancy is finishing the paint job on her house, slowly but surely.
See also: but, slow, sure

*steady as a rock

Cliché very steady and unmovable; very stable. (*Also: as ~.) His hand was steady as a rock as he made each incision. You must remain as steady as a rock when you are arguing with your supervisor.
See also: rock, steady

go steady

Date one person exclusively, as in Parents often don't approve of their children's decision to go steady. This usage may be obsolescent. [Slang; c. 1900] Also see go together, def. 2; go with, def. 1.
See also: go, steady

go with

1. Also, go out with. Accompany; also, date regularly. For example, When I leave, do you want to go with me? or Jerry has been going out with Frieda for two years. [Mid-1500s]
2. Be associated with, as in His accent goes with his background. [c. 1600]
3. Take the side of someone, as in I'll go with you in defending his right to speak freely. [Mid-1400s] Also see go along, def. 2.
4. Also, go well with. Look good with, match. For example, This chair goes well with the rest of the furniture, or That color doesn't go with the curtains. [Early 1700]
See also: go

slow but sure

Gradual or plodding but certain to finish, as in Slow but sure this book's getting written. This idiom was first recorded in 1562, although the idea is much older. A related phrase appears in the proverb slow and steady wins the race, which is the moral of Aesop's fable about the race between a tortoise and a hare, which stopped to nap during the race and therefore lost.
See also: but, slow, sure

steady as a rock

Firm, dependable, as in Betty always knows her part; she's steady as a rock. This simile uses rock in the sense of "something that affords a sure support," a usage dating from the early 1500s.
See also: rock, steady

a steady hand on the tiller

BRITISH
If you have a steady hand on the tiller, you are keeping control of a situation in a calm and reliable way. `If ever there was an urgent need for a steady hand on the tiller, it is now,' said one European diplomat. Note: Adjectives such as firm can be used instead of steady. He was convinced that the job of those in power was to keep a firm hand on the tiller guiding the course of national development. Note: In a boat, the tiller is the handle with which you steer.
See also: hand, on, steady, tiller

at a clip

at a time; all at once. US informal
2000 Anthony Bourdain Kitchen Confidential I peeled 75 pounds of shrimp at a clip.
See also: clip

slow but (or and) sure

not quick but achieving the required result eventually. proverb
See also: but, slow, sure

go steady

have a regular romantic or sexual relationship with a particular person. informal
1905 Edith Wharton The House of Mirth I thought we were to be married: he'd gone steady with me six months and given me his mother's wedding ring.
See also: go, steady

steady as she goes

keep on with the same careful progress. informal
In nautical vocabulary, steady is the instruction given to the helmsman to keep the ship on the same course.
1998 Bookseller His boss set him one task: ‘steady as she goes, but more so’.
See also: goes, she, steady

at a fast, good, steady, etc. ˈclip

(especially American English) quickly: Land prices will rise at a healthy clip.
See also: clip

ready, steady, ˈgo!

(British English) (also (get) ready, (get) set, ˈgo! American English, British English ) what you say to tell people to start a race

go ˈsteady (with somebody)

(old-fashioned, informal) have somebody as a regular boyfriend or girlfriend: Martin and Ingrid have been going steady for nearly a year.
See also: go, steady

(as) steady as a ˈrock

extremely steady and calm; that you can rely on: Even though she must have been frightened, her voice was as steady as a rock and she looked him straight in the eyes when she spoke.
See also: rock, steady

steady ˈon!

(informal) be more careful about what you do or say; slow down: Steady on, you two, let’s not get angry!Steady on, you’ll break it!
See also: steady

go with

v.
1. To proceed in the company of someone or something: I'll go with you to the supermarket if we also stop by the ice cream shop.
2. To select or choose something: We decided to go with the pink wallpaper, even though it doesn't match our carpet.
3. To be matched or suited to something; belong with something: The big lid goes with the stock pot. These shoes will go nicely with my red dress. This wine goes well with spicy food.
4. To be a secondary effect of being something or some way: The risk of injury goes with being a firefighter. I enjoyed being a politician and especially all the privileges that went with it. There are many health problems that go with obesity.
5. To combine with something so that a balanced or harmonious result is achieved. Used chiefly in the infinitive: The museum hosted a series of lectures to go with the art exhibit. I made a sauce to go with the meat.
6. To be in a romantic relationship with someone: Mary started going with Bill after she broke up with her boyfriend.
See also: go

steady

n. a boyfriend or girlfriend. She showed up with Tom, her steady for the past few months.

slow but sure

Plodding but reliable. This proverbial term dates from the early seventeenth century, and the idea is as old as Aesop’s fable about the tortoise and the hare. “This snail’s slow but sure,” wrote John Marston in his 1606 play The Fawn (3:1).
See also: but, slow, sure

steady as a rock

Unwavering. This simile, which clearly alludes to a very large immobile rock, dates from the mid-1800s. It is used to describe either physical steadfastness or mental, behavioral stability. The former is meant by J. B. Harwood in Lady Flavia (1865): “The hand that held the candle was steady as a rock.” The latter appears in “You can count on John to run the office; he’s steady as a rock.”
See also: rock, steady
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, where this grip loses out to its counterparts is when it comes to weapon steadiness. This counteracts the reduction in horizontal recoil, which makes this a less favourable grip.
Retriever steadiness training will help you develop your pup into a great hunting partner, one who's quiet in the blind and dependably steady during flush, shot, and fall.
* Steadiness: Relating to patience, persistence and thoughtfulness.
Reliance on the steadiness of the United States' measures for paying its debts would be undermined.
He explains that the Japanese approach to reforms is markedly different from Europe and the US and is characterized by slow steadiness. Coverage encompasses the regulatory structure and reforms in eight Japanese public utility industries: electric power, gas utility, water supply, railway, local bus, postal service, telecommunications, and broadcasting--focusing on the period between 1990 and 2010.
And also that the Islamic Republic of Iran stands with the same steadiness by Lebanon along with its resistance and its dear people." Speaker Berri concurred with his Iranian counterpart, stating that unfortunate events in the region aimed at stability, which "emphasizes the need to promote unity...and this was confirmed during these talks and this visit." R.Z.
The outside backs, especially wings Julian Savea and Cory Jane, enjoyed the freedom, scoring five tries between them while fly-half Dan Carter's steadiness kept the pressure on the home side throughout.
There's an immense steadiness about these songs, but also a sort of undeniable force, like a slow-moving freight train.
Cool Hand Luke's steadiness means he has halfway leader James Morrison firmly in his sights,withDavidDrysdalealso finishingoneightunder .
Sometimes that is a temporary situation, but all too often a whole childhood is blighted because there is no-one there to offer the affection, guidance and steadiness that every kid needs.
Tokyo, February 1( ANI ): The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has said that Japan's two-stage test to determine the steadiness of its nuclear plants in the event of a natural catastrophe, requires more work.
"He is always ready for a fight, never gives up, keeps his steadiness and mental strength, never shows any strain."
"steadiness" shown by the UK's police and politicians in handling the riots,
Total employment in May was down 1,990 jobs compared to last year, but the steadiness of the job market in recent months indicates the labor market may be bottoming out, said regional labor economist Reinhold Groepler.
I analyzed the correlation and noticed that the idea of trigger pull, steadiness, muscle stamina and sight picture and alignment are close to the same techniques.