steady

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steady hand on the tiller

Full control over a situation. I felt comfortable knowing that even during this difficult time, he had a steady hand on the tiller.
See also: hand, on, steady, tiller

steady the ship

1. To steer a ship so that it sails smoothly. I'm really glad they've steadied the ship—those waves were making me so nauseous!
2. By extension, to restore calm and order to a situation. I just recently got divorced, so I hope my mother moving in and helping with the kids will steady the ship. We just hired a new supervisor to steady the ship after this merger.
See also: ship, steady

steady as she goes

Describing someone or something that is progressing in a stable manner. This nautical phrase was originally used in reference to a ship that was sailing steadily. (Ships were traditionally assigned the female gender.) A: "How's your new business coming along?" B: "Steady as she goes! We expect to break even the first year and then start making a profit." In the midst of all this social upheaval, I hope our government can stay steady-as-she-goes.
See also: goes, she, steady

slow but sure

Slow or incremental but yielding steady, dependable progress. It's going to be slow but sure writing my thesis, as I have to balance my part-time job with my research. A: "Hey, how's the new novel coming along?" B: "It's been slow but sure."
See also: but, slow, sure

go with someone

 and go steady with someone
to have a romantic relationship with someone. (Go steady is dated.) Sally has been going with Mark for two months now. He wants to go steady with her. He doesn't want her to see other guys.

go with (someone or something)

to depart in the company of someone or a group. Jim's not here. He went with the last busload. I'm leaving now. Do you want to go with?

go with something

 
1. Lit. to accompany something agreeably. Milk doesn't go with grapefruit. Pink doesn't go with orange.
2. Fig. to choose something (over something else). I think I'll go with the yellow one. We decided to go with the oak table rather than the walnut one.

slow and steady wins the race

Prov. If you work slowly but constantly, you will succeed better than if you work fast for a short while and do not continue. (Associated with Aesop's fable of "The Tortoise and the Hare.") Joy only had a little bit of time to spend sewing every day, but she worked steadily and soon had finished a beautiful quilt. Slow and steady wins the race.
See also: and, race, slow, steady, win

slow but sure

 and slowly but surely
slow but unstoppable. Bob's progress on his novel was slow but sure. Nancy is finishing the paint job on her house, slowly but surely.
See also: but, slow, sure

*steady as a rock

Cliché very steady and unmovable; very stable. (*Also: as ~.) His hand was steady as a rock as he made each incision. You must remain as steady as a rock when you are arguing with your supervisor.
See also: rock, steady

go steady

Date one person exclusively, as in Parents often don't approve of their children's decision to go steady. This usage may be obsolescent. [Slang; c. 1900] Also see go together, def. 2; go with, def. 1.
See also: steady

go with

1. Also, go out with. Accompany; also, date regularly. For example, When I leave, do you want to go with me? or Jerry has been going out with Frieda for two years. [Mid-1500s]
2. Be associated with, as in His accent goes with his background. [c. 1600]
3. Take the side of someone, as in I'll go with you in defending his right to speak freely. [Mid-1400s] Also see go along, def. 2.
4. Also, go well with. Look good with, match. For example, This chair goes well with the rest of the furniture, or That color doesn't go with the curtains. [Early 1700]

slow but sure

Gradual or plodding but certain to finish, as in Slow but sure this book's getting written. This idiom was first recorded in 1562, although the idea is much older. A related phrase appears in the proverb slow and steady wins the race, which is the moral of Aesop's fable about the race between a tortoise and a hare, which stopped to nap during the race and therefore lost.
See also: but, slow, sure

steady as a rock

Firm, dependable, as in Betty always knows her part; she's steady as a rock. This simile uses rock in the sense of "something that affords a sure support," a usage dating from the early 1500s.
See also: rock, steady

a steady hand on the tiller

BRITISH
If you have a steady hand on the tiller, you are keeping control of a situation in a calm and reliable way. `If ever there was an urgent need for a steady hand on the tiller, it is now,' said one European diplomat. Note: Adjectives such as firm can be used instead of steady. He was convinced that the job of those in power was to keep a firm hand on the tiller guiding the course of national development. Note: In a boat, the tiller is the handle with which you steer.
See also: hand, on, steady, tiller

go with

v.
1. To proceed in the company of someone or something: I'll go with you to the supermarket if we also stop by the ice cream shop.
2. To select or choose something: We decided to go with the pink wallpaper, even though it doesn't match our carpet.
3. To be matched or suited to something; belong with something: The big lid goes with the stock pot. These shoes will go nicely with my red dress. This wine goes well with spicy food.
4. To be a secondary effect of being something or some way: The risk of injury goes with being a firefighter. I enjoyed being a politician and especially all the privileges that went with it. There are many health problems that go with obesity.
5. To combine with something so that a balanced or harmonious result is achieved. Used chiefly in the infinitive: The museum hosted a series of lectures to go with the art exhibit. I made a sauce to go with the meat.
6. To be in a romantic relationship with someone: Mary started going with Bill after she broke up with her boyfriend.

steady

n. a boyfriend or girlfriend. She showed up with Tom, her steady for the past few months.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the steadiest players on tour, the 28-year-old added a flourish to yesterday's card with an eagle three from 20 feet at the 15th.
Morgan, who is a strong candidate to make her Solheim debut in Barseback, had the steadiest rounds of the day with 17 pars and a birdie at the par-four 13th.
Denmark's Soren Hansen lay two shots behind on 209 thanks to the day's steadiest round - a two-under-par 70 - made up of two birdies and 16 pars.
NEW YORK(FNS)--Caught in a market decline that shook up Wall Street's steadiest performers, home furnishings manufacturers came out of the 5-week period ended July 16, bloodied but unbowed.
O'Toole's steadiest job through the intervening years has been answering telephones at her brother's moving company.
CHICAGO -- Data growth, especially high speed data (HSD) access provided by Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL), remains one of the steadiest sources of growth in the U.
The May issue of the magazine noted that "Our top scorer kept temps steadiest to help food last.
The Abergele professional, twice a Solheim Cup player and one of the steadiest players on the tour since turning professional in 2004, has had a poor start to the season by her standards, missing the cut in her first four events in Australia, New Zealand and China.
SIMON BURTON believes the championship race will be won by the side who shows the steadiest hand.
When a balance between supply and demand is restored, then affordable property units will provide the steadiest return and will not lose value.
Sarah, a former therapist on cruise liners, has the steadiest hand we've seen.
The Big Ten offensive player of the year has been Illinois' steadiest performer with 127.
Backing the Chancellor, Tony Blair said: "We've had 10 years of the steadiest rises in living standards that this country has seen probably since the Second World War.
Fortunately the heir, Prince Albert, is the dullest and apparently steadiest of the lot.
Here are six examples of players shunted about in the coaches's two and a half-year reign: DAVID WEIR France 5 Scotland 0 ONE of the steadiest centre-halves in the Premiership at the time the Everton star was pitched in at right-back, a position he has hated since John Lambie forced him out there at Falkirk.