stead


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hold (someone) in good stead

Especially of a talent, ability, or experience, to prove particularly useful or beneficial to someone in the future. Janet is hoping her internship working in IT will hold her in good stead when she looks for a job after college.
See also: good, hold, stead

in (someone's or something's) stead

As the representative of someone or something; in place of someone or something. (Typically used in slightly more formal language.) The boss isn't here at the moment, but I'd be happy to sign for the package in her stead. My horse was stolen, so I am forced to ride this donkey in its stead.
See also: stead

stand (one) in good stead

Especially of a talent, ability, or experience, to prove particularly useful or beneficial to one in the future. Janet is hoping her internship working in IT will stand her in good stead when she looks for a job after college.
See also: good, stand, stead

stand someone in good stead

[for something] to be of great use and benefit to someone. I know that my large vocabulary will always stand me in good stead at college. Any experience you can get in dealing with the public will stand you in good stead no matter what line of work you go into.
See also: good, stand, stead

in someone's shoes

Also, in someone else's shoes; in someone's place or stead . Acting for another person or experiencing something as another person might; in another's position or situation. For example, If you were in my shoes, would you ask the new secretary for a date? or In your shoes I wouldn't accept the offer, or Can you go to the theater in my place? or He was speaking in her stead. The idioms alluding to shoes, with their image of stepping into someone's shoes, date from about 1700 and are generally used in a conditional clause beginning with if. Stead, dating from the 1300s, and place, from the 1500s, are used more loosely. Also see fill someone's shoes; put someone in his or her place; take someone's place.
See also: shoe

instead of

Also, in lieu of; in place of; in someone's stead. In substitution for, rather than. For example, She wore a dress instead of slacks, or They had a soprano in lieu of a tenor, or In place of soft drinks they served fruit juice, or The chairman spoke in her stead. Instead of dates from about 1200; in lieu of, which borrows lieu, meaning "place," from French, dates from the late 1200s; in place of dates from the 1500s; and in someone's stead from the 1200s. Also see under in someone's shoes.
See also: of

stand in good stead

Be extremely useful, as in That umbrella stood me in good stead on our trip; it rained every day. [c. 1300]
See also: good, stand, stead

in someone's shoes

COMMON If you talk about being in someone's shoes, you are describing how you would feel or act if you were in the same situation as them. Stop and think how you would feel if you were in his shoes. If I were in her shoes, I'd probably want an explanation. If you were in his shoes what would you do? Note: You can also say that you wouldn't like to be in someone's shoes, meaning that you would not like to be in the same situation as them. I wouldn't like to be in Bryce's shoes when Kathy finds out what he's done.
See also: shoe

stand someone in good stead

(of something learned or acquired) be advantageous or useful to someone over time or in the future.
See also: good, someone, stand, stead

in somebody’s/something’s ˈstead

(formal) instead of somebody/something: Foxton was dismissed and John Smith was appointed in his stead.
See also: stead

stand somebody in good ˈstead

be useful to somebody: Learning German will stand her in good stead when she goes to work in the export department.
See also: good, somebody, stand, stead
References in periodicals archive ?
Stead pounced from Jorge Grant's superb low cross to equalise Luciano Narsingh's stinging right-foot drive.
Newcastle Crown Court heard Mr Stead had been in a relationship with Leanne Mould for several years and they had a young child.
Lindley added a further 18 points to the Woodfield Park margin after beating Stead in set six.
Stead said the Board of Supervisors will eventually work to permanently fill the solid waste director vacancy.
Tragically, WT Stead was considered to be one of the most famous British people to be lost on the Titanic.
Relying on personal contacts, Stead offered news to astound or outrage audiences, priming them for civic engagement albeit in very specific cases.
In July 1885 Stead served two months of a three-month sentence for abduction.
STEAD THE SAVIOUR: Bristol City's Jon Stead shows his delight after his late winner
A footnote Stead, 62, added reads: "This is exactly what will take place if liners are sent to sea short of boats.
If the alleged activities of some News of the World reporters acted as a catalyst for the Leveson inquiry, much of the former newspaper's raison d'etre stemmed from Stead.
Bizarrely, officers were directed there by Stead himself, the court was told.
The company asked Stead, the executive chairman, to step into the CEO role as well.
Stead, the subject of Grace Eckley's biography, Maiden Tribute, is perhaps one of the most influential, if not productive, of these determined reformers.
Loren Stead, 40, had been pulled over for speeding in the West Roxbury neighbourhood, and officers noticed that he was sweating profusely and breathing heavily.
ROY KEANE accused Crystal Palace players of pressurising referee Paul Taylor into sending off Jonathan Stead.