stay-at-home mom

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stay-at-home mom

A mother who forgoes employment outside of the home in order to care for her children and the household. Being a stay-at-home mom is just as much hard work as going to an office every day.
See also: mom
References in periodicals archive ?
"Rather than spending less time with their kids, research shows that, on average, parents actually spend more total time with their kids now than they ever have." And when it comes to time spent interacting with kids--through singing, reading or feeding them, among other activities--"you find that by 2000 working mothers spent as much time as stay-at-home moms did back in 1975."
Yet how many women in those ideal days, I wonder, wished they could have launched careers in business, academia or politics, instead of being forced by tradition to be stay-at-home moms? And how many people attended church every Sunday for the very same reason?
Its a group of stay-at-home moms and working moms, pediatricians, obstetricians, advocates and families that aims to help mommies and families during the difficult times of raising infants and toddlers.
For every woman who has struggled with the concept of investing or groaned at the thought of retirement funds and college tuition, Smart Mom, Rich Mom: How to Build Wealth While Raising a Family puts everything into perspective with action steps and strategies for working and stay-at-home moms. Bringing out the "fun" in "funds," Kimberly Palmer, who was the senior money editor at US News & World Report for nine years, covers everything from eliminating credit card debt and maximizing online shopping experiences to commiserating over the trials of lactating at the office.
Then there are the stereotypes--the corporate mom who is constantly dashing off to board meetings; the stay-at-home moms who're in charge of everything at the school; and a plethora of others.
STAY-at-home moms and dads probably know the feeling.
For decades, the number of stay-at-home moms had been declining, but a recent report by the Pew Research Center shows that the number of stay-at-home mothers has risen in recent years.
Before her counseling career, she opened and ran a licensed drop-in child care center for stay-at-home moms. When she has free time, she boats on lake Erie with her husband and likes to cook.
However, he was really off-base when he described how groups with opposing views could come together, saying that "Feminists could jump rope with stay-at-home moms.''
Psychology professors and stay-at-home moms, corporate designers, people with all sorts of day jobs who are unfulfilled creatively at work--and suddenly find themselves moonlighting as working artists, actually making money from their art.
Rather than fuelling the "Mommy Wars" debate, which pits stay-at-home moms against working moms, Frech believes that a recently identified group - she calls this group "persistently unemployed" - deserves further attention, as they appear to be the least healthy at age 40.
New research from University of Akron Assistant Sociology Professor Adrianne Frech finds that moms who work full time are healthier at age 40 than stay-at-home moms, moms who work part time, or moms who have some work history, but are repeatedly unemployed.
Non-employed women with young children at home are more likely than women with young children at home who are employed for pay to report experiencing sadness and anger a lot of the day "yesterday." Stay-at-home moms are also much more likely to report having ever been diagnosed with depression than employed moms.
Stay-at-home moms may be more socially isolated than working moms, which might increase their chances of being depressed, the researchers said.