start at

start at (something)

1. verb To have some initial or minimum monetary value. Our computers start at $400, getting more expensive the more powerful you want it to be. We're starting the price at $150,000 for the house, but we may have to lower it if there aren't any decent offers. Cashiers start at $8 an hour, but we offer pay raises after you've been with us for at least six months.
2. noun The beginning point of some task or activity that one is undertaking. We might as well make a start at the dishes. This scheme gives young families an early start at saving up for the deposit on their first homes.
See also: start

start at

v.
1. To have some value as a minimum: This line of new cars starts at $22,000.
2. To begin some job at some initial salary: I started at $8.00 per hour, but I get more now.
3. To move suddenly or involuntarily: The horses started at the loud noise.
See also: start
References in classic literature ?
It was impossible to start at so late an hour, and so it was not till next day soon after dawn that he set out.
I say, 'All the time you make start at five o'clock.
And we start at three o'clock, for I am their man, and that which they say is to be done, I do.
Drivers, if you don't start your M109 howitzer fight during cold weather, it won't start at all.
Total starts for the first three months of this year start at 15 units, up from 11 units a year ago.
Normally, if you start at some point and then start at a slightly different point, you generally expect to come down on the same attractor," Alexander says.