star as (one)

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star as (one)

To have a leading role as a particular character in a play, film, television series, etc. Samantha Hornsby stars as Mary, a woman driven to desperate measures to protect her daughter from the mob. He is starring as George Washington in a play on Broadway this summer.
See also: star

star as someone or something

[for someone] to be a featured performer, representing a particular person, or play in a particular role. Judy starred as Evita in the broadway production of the same name. Mary starred as an aging countess.
See also: star
References in classic literature ?
"I think Miss Leeson has just as much right to name stars as any of those old astrologers had."
But stars as young as V838 Monocerotis haven't had a chance to mix lithium into their cores and would have high concentrations of the element at their surfaces even without invoking planet swallowing, notes Mark Rushton of Keele University in England.
For example, several recent surveys have shown that some stars as old as a billion years are surrounded by large amounts of dust.
Thilker of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and his colleagues found clusters of UV-emitting stars as far out as 80,000 light-years from the core.
"If there were many O stars, then there should also be many Wolf-Rayet stars as well, notes Leitherer.
Stars as heavy as the sun, for example, live for about 10 billion years.
The sharp eyes of Hubble and other new telescopes are now capturing images of young stars as their gaseous cocoon is torn apart by their massive neighbors.
Distant stars appear to have a smaller wobble than nearby stars as they move across the sky, but their back-and-forth motion remains the same.
The four pairs represent a tiny fraction of the total number of neutron stars thought to have other neutron stars as partners.
In his computer model, this stable configuration leads to intricate and beautiful patterns for the orbit of the two inner stars as they oscillate in a nearly circular path.
From William Shakespeare to Cole Porter, poets and songwriters have hailed stars as a constant in nature.
According to one theoretical model, that assumption would put the mass of the faintest of these stars as low as 5 percent of the sun's mass -- low enough for it to be a brown dwarf.
Edward Guinan of Villanova (Pa.) University reports that atmospheric features of stars as well as surface features can be determined from photometric, spectroscopic and X-ray observations of starspots by taking advantage of the eclipses that occur in binary systems.